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Old 05-26-2018, 11:35 AM   #1
Dread6
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Lightbulb Checking My Valve Clearence

Just need my math double checked before I pick up the shims. To me all my intake valve clearances are in spec and all of my exhaust are out of spec.

Cylinder #1 Cylinder #2 Cylinder # 3

Intake 1 0.152mm 0.152mm 0.127mm

Intake 2 0.178mm 0.178mm 0.127mm

Exhaust 1 0.229mm 0.229mm 0.229mm

Exhaust 2 0.229mm 0.229mm 0.356mm


Intake 1 = Intake Camshaft Lobe #1 starting at the camshaft gear side going in the opposite direction.


Spec = Intake = 0.10mm 0.20mm

Exhaust = 0.275mm 0.325mm



Cylinder #1 Cylinder #2 Cylinder #3

Exhaust 1 (238) 2.31mm (240) 2.37mm (232) 2.25mm

Exhaust 2 (232) 2.26mm (232) 2.25mm (230) 2.21mm


In Parenthesis is the number stamped on the shim, the thickness is what I measured with 2 different digital Micrometers (Digital Calipers)


Formula I am using A= (B-C) + D

A= New Shim Thickness

B = Recorded Valve Clearance

C = Specified Valve Clearance

D = Old Shim Thickness


C1E1= Cylinder #1 Exhaust Lobe #1

C3E2 + Cylinder # 2 Exhaust Lobe # 2


Size Shim needed for each valve

C1E1 = 2.239mm

C1E2 = 2.189mm

C2E1 = 2.299mm

C2E2 = 2.179mm

C3E1 = 2.179mm

C3E2 = 2.266mm
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Old 05-26-2018, 12:15 PM   #2
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I dig the post. I've never done my own valves.
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Old 05-26-2018, 05:03 PM   #3
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When doing your calculations what specified valve clearance did you use? You have a range of .275mm -.325mm .

Most shims are only available in .50 increments. Give me the value of C that you used in calculating your measurements..
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Old 05-26-2018, 06:44 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pdub View Post
When doing your calculations what specified valve clearance did you use? You have a range of .275mm -.325mm .

Most shims are only available in .50 increments. Give me the value of C that you used in calculating your measurements..
I split it down the middle so .300mm is my valve for C
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Old 05-26-2018, 06:45 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Solracer View Post
I dig the post. I've never done my own valves.
Thanks 👍🏿

Don't! I just replaced a camshaft on a Ford Triton engine. That job was so much easier than this. It's not hard, it's just tedious AF!
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Old 05-30-2018, 08:25 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Solracer View Post
I dig the post. I've never done my own valves.


If/when you decide to tackle the 600R, I have a full Hotcams shim kit from when I did mine.
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Old 05-30-2018, 08:30 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dread6 View Post
Just need my math double checked before I pick up the shims. To me all my intake valve clearances are in spec and all of my exhaust are out of spec.



Cylinder #1 Cylinder #2 Cylinder # 3



Intake 1 0.152mm 0.152mm 0.127mm



Intake 2 0.178mm 0.178mm 0.127mm



Exhaust 1 0.229mm 0.229mm 0.229mm



Exhaust 2 0.229mm 0.229mm 0.356mm





Intake 1 = Intake Camshaft Lobe #1 starting at the camshaft gear side going in the opposite direction.





Spec = Intake = 0.10mm 0.20mm



Exhaust = 0.275mm 0.325mm







Cylinder #1 Cylinder #2 Cylinder #3



Exhaust 1 (238) 2.31mm (240) 2.37mm (232) 2.25mm



Exhaust 2 (232) 2.26mm (232) 2.25mm (230) 2.21mm





In Parenthesis is the number stamped on the shim, the thickness is what I measured with 2 different digital Micrometers (Digital Calipers)





Formula I am using A= (B-C) + D



A= New Shim Thickness



B = Recorded Valve Clearance



C = Specified Valve Clearance



D = Old Shim Thickness





C1E1= Cylinder #1 Exhaust Lobe #1



C3E2 + Cylinder # 2 Exhaust Lobe # 2





Size Shim needed for each valve



C1E1 = 2.239mm



C1E2 = 2.189mm



C2E1 = 2.299mm



C2E2 = 2.179mm



C3E1 = 2.179mm



C3E2 = 2.266mm


Dread6, do you ride a Triumph? I also have a full kit from when I had a Tiger Explorer. It left my garage in Harvey. Might be the same diameter. Its just collecting dust in my garage.
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Old 05-30-2018, 08:56 PM   #8
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The shims are 9.48mm in the kit I used for the Triumph.

My other kit for my Yamaha is 7.48mm.
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Old 06-02-2018, 08:10 AM   #9
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Sorry for the late reply my Internet browser froze when I hit submit, so I lost interest in typing this all out again. Valve Clearance check and adjustment complete, all went well. Rode 136 trouble free miles that day. My new manual camshaft tension was a little too tight, this caused the starter to sound weird. Also I need to readjust my tune on my bike.

Overall and easy job but its VERY TEDIOUS!! The constant checking and rechecking and rotating the engine over and over and over again. If you make adjustments you have to do over again, so you have to keep rechecking your math as well. Im paying a shop to do this next time lol!

Some things I learned

1. Get a helper for tedious jobs. As fatigue, hunger, boredom set in, you go from Lets take my time and do this right to I just want to be done with this Its good to have someone there to catch little things you will miss.

2. Its a 2 day job. While in there I found other things that needed to be addressed. All small and easy to fix but while the bike was a part it had to be done, which cost more time.

3. Removing the throttle cable bracket made getting the valve cover in and out a lot easier.

4. Even if you have Smog Block off plates, its the bolts that will get caught on the frame when trying to remove the valve cover

5. Lowering the radiator allows the checking of the valve clearances on the exhaust cam so much easier. Its just 3 bolts, removal is not required

6. 6 year old bike with 17,312 miles its just better to replace the gaskets. Its not so much the mileage but the amount of heat cycles these gaskets go through that dries them out. I spent $80 in parts, just replace them.

7. TDC on #1 and mark the Timing Chain with a paint marker. Mark 2 links on the camshafts and 1 link on the crankshaft. When reinstalling the camshaft cradle sometimes the cams move. Even with a camshaft locking tool, I would still mark the chain links, things happen.

8. Us a small but strong magnet on the cam buckets and place them dead center so they pick up the shim as well. Shims are the size of Altoid Mints and if they fall into the engine they will put a sizeable hole in your wallet.

9. Buy 5qts of oil. Qt was used to lube parts I removed, like the camshaft and I poured some on the lobes after making my adjustments before spinning the motor over, also some oil was poured on the chain. Debris is going to get inside the engine, dust, pieces of your hair, a crumb from what ever you were eating lol! I would let it run for a bit to make sure she was good then let her sit so everything drains to the pan and then change the oil.

10. Make a short video of your bike running and going through some RPM ranges before tearing it down. After this type of repair you are going notice ever single little sound this bike makes and start second guessing yourself. If you got this far and you are reading this, I know what face you are making right now lol!
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Old 06-02-2018, 08:12 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Angamico View Post
Dread6, do you ride a Triumph? I also have a full kit from when I had a Tiger Explorer. It left my garage in Harvey. Might be the same diameter. Its just collecting dust in my garage.
yes, a 2012 Triumph Daytona 675R

I am no sure if I ever want to do a job like this again, But I am curious to know how much you would want for the shim kit?
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