MotoHouston.com MotoHouston.com
Register Members List Member Map Media Calendar Garage Forum Home Mark Forums Read

Go Back   MotoHouston.com > Off Topic (everything else) > Off Topic
Forgot info?

Welcome to MotoHouston.com! You are currently viewing our forums as a guest which gives you limited access to the community. By joining our free community you will have access to great discounts from our sponsors, the ability to post topics, communicate privately with other members, respond to polls, upload content, free email, classifieds, and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free, join our community!

Register Today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.


Like us on Facebook! Regular shirt GIVEAWAYS and more

Advertisement

Reply
Share This Thread: 
Subscribe to this Thread Thread Tools
Old 03-18-2014, 11:36 AM   #1
Petro
C'Mon... Building 7
 
Petro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Feedback Rating: (2)
Posts: 10,160

Experience: 10+ years











“Never Has There Been A Safe Vaccine. Never Will There Be A Safe Vaccine” – Dr. Suzan

Petro is offline   Reply With Quote
Similar Topics
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Experimental Ebola vaccine appears safe, NIH says NewsBot Health 0 11-29-2014 02:10 PM
Oil spill effects: Is it safe to fish in bay? Is seafood safe to eat? NewsBot Houston - Local News 0 03-26-2014 06:40 PM
New vaccine could save little lives NewsBot Houston - Local News 0 12-20-2013 11:20 PM
Rabbies vaccine dropped from the sky NewsBot Houston - Local News 0 09-17-2013 09:20 PM
HIV Vaccine?? Grimace Off Topic 73 07-12-2010 05:24 PM
Advertisement
Old 03-18-2014, 11:52 AM   #2
Bevo
Hook 'em!
 
Bevo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Houston-The South Loop
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 25,744

Experience: 10+ years
Trackdays: 3

Bike(s):
'17 CBR1000S1 Tricolor
'14 CB1000R Matte Gray
'12 CBR1000RR (sold)
'10 CBR1000RR (destroyed)
'09 CBR1000RR C-ABS (sold)

Member Garage





Polio for everyone!
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by bumblebee View Post
"I lack skillz"
Bevo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 11:58 AM   #3
Bevo
Hook 'em!
 
Bevo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Houston-The South Loop
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 25,744

Experience: 10+ years
Trackdays: 3

Bike(s):
'17 CBR1000S1 Tricolor
'14 CB1000R Matte Gray
'12 CBR1000RR (sold)
'10 CBR1000RR (destroyed)
'09 CBR1000RR C-ABS (sold)

Member Garage





Dr. Suzanne Humphries and the International Medical Council on Vaccination: Antivaccine to the core

Posted by Orac on February 16, 2011

A couple of weeks ago, I had a bit of fun with a position statement by the International Medical Council on Vaccination (IMCV), which I called, in my own inimitable fashion, The clueless cite the ignorant to argue against vaccines. That’s exactly what it was, too, some truly clueless anti-vaccinationists arguing against vaccines and bolstering their argument with a hilariously pathetic list of signatories, among which were noted anti-vaccine activists, chiropractors, homeopaths, and other dubious practitioners totaling only between 80-90. Among those signatories was a woman named Suzanne Humphries, MD. We’ve dealt with Dr. Humphries before when she expressed anger at being called a quack and warning us pharma shills and minions that the “revolution has begun.”

Oooh. Scary.

This time around, Dr. Humphries has decided to tell us A Few Things I Know. Unfortunately for her, those “few things” she knows are precious few, and they are all wrong. But before we can deal with what Dr. Humphries thinks she knows, we first have to deal with her naked assertion of her medical credentials. In essence, Dr. Humphries begins with an argument from authority:

I am a Medical Doctor with credentials in internal medicine and nephrology (kidneys). I received a bachelor’s degree in theoretical physics in 1987 from Rutgers University. I mention the college degree in case any doubtful readers question my mental prowess. One can doubt my intellectual ability less if they first realize that I know how to figure out difficult things. I know how to look at something in depth for many hours or days until I understand the inner workings of it. This is what I learned to do in college. In fact the strenuous mind-bending exercise that was part of the physics curriculum made medical school easy. I found the study of the human body, chemistry and biology to be in comparison quite shallow, simple and easy to comprehend.

As someone who comes from a strong basic science background, having been a chemistry major (who graduated with honors–so, there!), I think I can see Dr. Humphries’ problem. First, she seems unduly proud of her science background, wielding it like a talisman against charges that she doesn’t know what she’s talking about (which she doesn’t). Unfortunately, as those of us in medicine know, what you did 25 or more years ago in college has little bearing on what you can or can’t understand now. I can also see a bit of arrogance there, too. Let’s put it this way. I took advanced physical chemistry, graduate level biochemistry, and upper level physics, but I didn’t find medical school easy at all. One reason was that medical school required a whole lot of memorization in addition to basic science. Unfortunately, having been used to learning general principles and then applying them to problems, I found the memorization required to be rather difficult. Another problem I encountered was that, unlike chemistry and biochemical assays, I had trouble dealing with the ambiguity of medicine, of synthesizing incomplete and sometimes ambiguous clinical information in the form of patient histories, physical examinations, lab values, and tests and then applying what I had learned about the science of medicine to them. “Shades of gray” would be a good term to describe it, and I was used to more black and white. It took a major change in mindset before I began to understand. That change in mindset wasn’t easy, and it didn’t take overnight. Dr. Humphries’ problem is that she sounds as though she never changed her mindset from physics to medicine–and is proud of it.

Next up, Dr. Humphries assures us that she spent two years working in a biochemistry laboratory as a head technician. I’ll go her one better, if that’s the direction she wants to go. Not only have I been a technician, but I have also been a graduate student in a translational research laborotory, a postoctoral fellow, and now a medical researcher for the last 12 years in his own laboratory. As such, I would guess that I probably know more about how research is done than Dr. Humphries. Even so, it’s also probably irrelvant, because it’s the quality of one’s arguments that should rule, and, quite frankly, Dr. Humphries has become a homeopath. To embrace homeopathy, as far as I’m concerned, means throwing away all that knowledge of physics that tells us that homeopathy is nothing more than pseudoscience based on a mixture of prescientific beliefs drawing from the principles of sympathetic magic. In any case, I find it instructive to look at Dr. Humphries’ “conversion story,” but first we have to listen to her tell us again how awesome she is and how open-minded, too:

I have spent four years teaching internal medicine and nephrology to medical students, residents and advanced fellows in training at a university hospital as an assistant professor. During that time, reading over and critiquing dozens of journal articles was a part of everyday life. Suffice it to say, my past experiences have put me in good standing to look into the problems with vaccines and make certain determinations. Like most doctors, I held a blind belief for many years, that vaccines were necessary, safe and effective. Like most doctors, I never lifted a page to seek out any other truth for myself. But unlike most doctors, I have no stake in upholding false paradigms and I am no longer indebted to the government for hundreds of thousands of dollars. Unlike most doctors, I have the means to survive with or without my medical license because I have sought out another education to support myself in case of worst case scenario.

Do you get it? Dr. Humphries is a Seeker of The Truth, man! And don’t you forget it! She don’t need no stinkin’ pharmaceutical drugs, and she don’t need no “conventional medicine,” either! She spits on Lord Draconis Zeneca‘s scaly hide. (She will come to regret that, actually. Our benevolent scaly pharma overlord will make sure of it, I’m certain.) I also love how she refers to “the truth,” as in, “The Truth? You can’t handle The Truth?” I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again, science is not about the truth (or The Truth). It’s about evidence and data and what can be observed. It’s about models, explanations, and theories that explain current observations and make predictions. All “truths” in science are provisional. If the evidence doesn’t support a model anymore, scientists abandon it in favor of a model that better explains the existing evidence. But it’s all about The Truth to Dr. Humphries:

Up until 2 years ago I was content to work as a medical doctor caring for very sick people with kidney failure. Two years ago, everything changed. With several undeniable cases of kidney-associated vaccine injury in previously healthy people, I started to look deeper into the information that I had previously held as factual and not worthy of debate. I started to study vaccines, their components, and the science behind the statements of safety and effectiveness. From there an avalanche of truth collapsed upon me and I will never be the same. In fact, nothing I look at will ever be the same. Chronic degenerative diseases, kidney failure, autoimmune diseases and powers of authority will never look the same to me again. There are certain things that I can now say with no uncertainty.

An “avalanche of truth”? Wow! Is that like a “tsunami of autism”? Still, I have no doubt that Dr. Humphries will never be the same. She has, after all, become a homeopath. If she used to practice science-based medicine before she turned to woo, then, yes, her life has changed, and she will never be the same. That’s not always a good thing. In Dr. Humphrie’s case, it certainly is not. Still, I’m curious about these cases of “kidney-associated vaccine injury.” She doesn’t elaborate, and, quite frankly, I didn’t have time to watch this video last night, where she apparently makes the same claim. Oh, never mind, it’s close to the beginning of the video. Dr. Humphries states that back in the winter of 2009 she saw several cases of fulminant kidney failure in patients who had had their seasonal flu vaccine and their H1N1 vaccine. In some cases these cases were up to six weeks after vaccination.

Six weeks? Gee. With millions of people being vaccinated against H1N1, what do you think the odds are of seeing a few cases of patients in fulminant kidney failure that began sometime within the six weeks after they had been vaccinated? Pretty high, I’d guess. Probably pretty close to 100%, given the frequency of vaccination against the flu, particularly among the elderly, who are more prone to kidney failure, and the incidence of kidney failure. It’s a perfect example of confusing correlation with causation. She even goes so far as to say that she thinks “idiopathic” cases of kidney failure are really due to vaccines.

That’s because, to the anti-vaccine loon, it’s always about the vaccines. Always. Maybe later this week I’ll have a chance to go through the whole video. Or maybe not.

So, what are the “few things” (the very few things) that Dr. Humphries knows? Let’s take a look:

Vaccines did not save humanity and never will.

No one ever said they did, but they sure have reduced the rates of infectious disease and saved millions upon millions of lives.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by bumblebee View Post
"I lack skillz"
Bevo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 11:58 AM   #4
Bevo
Hook 'em!
 
Bevo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Houston-The South Loop
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 25,744

Experience: 10+ years
Trackdays: 3

Bike(s):
'17 CBR1000S1 Tricolor
'14 CB1000R Matte Gray
'12 CBR1000RR (sold)
'10 CBR1000RR (destroyed)
'09 CBR1000RR C-ABS (sold)

Member Garage





Next up:

Vaccines have never been proven truly safe except for perhaps the parameters of immediate death or some specific adverse events within up to 4 weeks.

So let me get this straight. Vaccines have never been tested for long term complications? What about all those studies the looked for and failed to find links between vaccines and autism, asthma, sudden infant death syndrome, and many other conditions? Oh, wait. Dr. Humphries put the word “truly” in there. So she’s conceding that vaccines are safe based on the science thus far. She just thinks they aren’t “truly” safe, whatever that means. (Note also how she’s simply using a variant of the word “truth”; she’s clearly all about The Truth–big T–than she is about science.) Actually, I rather suspect the word “truly” means whatever Humphries wants to mean, the better to shift goalposts as more studies verifying the safety of vaccines roll in.

And then Humphries pulls out a “thing she knows” about smallpox:

Smallpox was not eradicated by vaccines as many doctors readily say it was. They say this out of conditioning rather than out of understanding the history or science.

This is, of course, a straw man. The eradication of smallpox was multifactorial, including improved sanitation. However, that does not mean the smallpox vaccine was not instrumental in finally eradicating the disease once (and hopefully) for all. Thanks to vaccines, we were on the verge of eradicating polio; that is, until rumors that vaccines were a plot to sterilize Muslim men took hold and depressed vaccination rates, setting back the timetable for the eradication of polio.

And a “thing she knows” about polio, too:

Polio virus was not responsible for the paralysis in the first part of the 20th century. Polio vaccine research, development, testing and distribution has committed atrocities upon primates and humanity. Bill Gates is not a humanitarian.

Funny. Tell all the people in iron lungs 60 and 70 years ago that polio wasn’t responsible.

Finally, here’s the one thing Humphries “knows” about vaccines in general:

Vaccines are dangerous and should never be injected into anyone for any reason. They are not the answer to infectious diseases. There are many more sustainable and benevolent solutions than vaccines.

But it’s not as though Dr. Humphries is anti-vacccine or anything. She’s really pro-safe vaccine, right? Oh, wait. She is antivaccine. She just said so. She just told us that vaccines are dangerous and should never be injected into anyone for any reason. If that’s not anti-vaccine, I don’t know what is.

Just like the IMCV, which is clearly anti-vaccine to the core.

http://scienceblogs.com/insolence/20...e-internation/
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by bumblebee View Post
"I lack skillz"
Bevo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 11:59 AM   #5
Jae
Kilted Basterd
 
Jae's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Cypress
Feedback Rating: (9)
Posts: 5,163

Experience: 10+ years

Bike(s):
'08 GSX-R 600 (for sale, inquire within)
'08 Hypermotard (borrowed, ATM)
Russian POS ??


Member Garage


I agree that vaccinations are evil tricks by satan to get us to abandon our faith in 's healing power, and only He can save us from this plague of illness.

http://thinkprogress.org/health/2014...s-vaccination/

Quote:
Measles Is Spreading In Our Largest Cities Because People Aren’t Vaccinating Their Kids
BY TARA CULP-RESSLER ON MARCH 14, 2014 AT 2:02 PM

New York City is currently grappling with a measles outbreak. Health officials have identified 16 cases of the highly contagious infectious disease, resulting in at least six hospitalizations, and are now warning unvaccinated individuals that they need to get their shots.
And New York isn’t the only place where measles — which was once so rare that it was virtually eradicated in the U.S. back in 2000 — is cropping up again. Within the past two months, health officials have also identified cases in the Boston, San Francisco, San Diego, and Dallas areas. Measles have also recently been reported in suburban areas in Connecticut and Illinois.
Just one case of measles can pose a huge public health threat, since it has the potential to be transmitted quickly. It can spread through the air when an infected individual coughs or sneezes. For instance, last month, thousands of California commuters were potentially exposed to the disease after an unvaccinated man with the measles rode public transportation.
Many of the measles outbreaks here in the U.S. originate after an unvaccinated individual has traveled abroad and contracted the disease there. Then, when they return to this country, they can spread measles among pockets of other unvaccinated people. This isn’t an issue if most people simply get the MMR vaccine, which protects against measles, mumps, and rubella. That’s why San Francisco didn’t experience a larger outbreak after the recent public transportation scare there — the rates of MMR vaccination in that city are high.
But, thanks to ongoing anti-vaccine propaganda, that’s not necessarily the case everywhere. An increasing number of parents are choosing to forgo their kids’ MMR shot based on scientifically inaccurate claims that it can lead to autism. The actress and model Jenny McCarthy, who’s a prominent anti-vaccine activist, has a lot to do with that. By 2008, about one in four adults reported they were familiar with McCarthy’s views about vaccines, and 40 percent of them said her claims led them to question vaccine safety. This issue hasn’t died down since then; just this week, Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler and his wife, former reality TV star Kristin Cavallari, said they won’t vaccinate their kids over fears about autism.
Federal health officials have already been able to connect the dots here. Last fall, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a report warning that anti-vaccine beliefs have fueled a rise in measles cases. Researchers noted that 2013 saw the highest number of measles cases in nearly two decades, and 80 percent of those cases occurred among unvaccinated people — most of whom cited “philosophical differences” with the MMR vaccine.
“I hope that those who are vaccine hesitant or vaccine avoidant realize there are consequences to their actions,” Dr. Buddy Creech, a pediatric infectious disease expert at Vanderbilt University who partnered with the CDC to publicize the release of that report, said back in September. “None of us lives in isolation.”
Nonetheless, this continues to be a contentious issue on the state level. Vaccine requirements vary, and some states allow parents to easily opt their kids out of the necessary shots by simply signing a form. Even though vaccine exemptions have been directly tied to infectious disease outbreaks, some state residents continue to resist efforts to crack down on those loopholes.







...or something...
__________________
Keeping the "F-U" in "fun"

Last edited by Jae; 03-18-2014 at 12:03 PM.
Jae is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 12:01 PM   #6
jetcycles
Repeat Offender
 
jetcycles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: ShoreAcres
Feedback Rating: (15)
Posts: 12,442

Experience: 10+ years

Bike(s):
1950 Chevy Deluxe
1980 Honda CT70
1987 Kawasaki 650SX
1996 Honda Z50






Send a message via AIM to jetcycles
I bet she's had vaccinations. I bet you've had vaccinations. I bet everyone reading this thread has had vaccinations. Look at how detrimental those vaccinations were to all of us!!! This video is typical of your "far out" viewpoints, I'd go so far as to call it propaganda. This video doesn't present a single statistic supporting her obviously biased view points, so why should anyone give two about what she states? I believe in science and statistical analysis combined with extensive research as opposed to fear mongering. Nice shot, but you missed the mark bigtime if you're shooting for anyone other than those who are totally uneducated on the subject.


For those curious about vaccinations for your children, I'd suggest reading The Vaccine Book by Dr. Robert Sears and forming your own opinion on the subject based on actual science and statistical data.
__________________
I understand the consequences of my actions prior to engaging in those actions. . .there are certain situations in life where the risk is totally worth the reward.
jetcycles is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 12:02 PM   #7
Bevo
Hook 'em!
 
Bevo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Houston-The South Loop
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 25,744

Experience: 10+ years
Trackdays: 3

Bike(s):
'17 CBR1000S1 Tricolor
'14 CB1000R Matte Gray
'12 CBR1000RR (sold)
'10 CBR1000RR (destroyed)
'09 CBR1000RR C-ABS (sold)

Member Garage





Suzanne Humphries From RationalWiki

Suzanne Humphries is a nephrologist (kidney doctor) who has recently (as of 2011) become a vocal proponent of pseudoscience and quack medicine. Humphries has been involved with the International Medical Council on Vaccination, a front group for vaccine hysteria, and is a signer of the organization's anti-vax Project Steve petition. She has written several blog posts and done several podcasts and interviews insinuating that kidney failure is caused by vaccines.[1][2] Humphries uses this purely anecdotal, unstudied, "feeling" of vaccines' role in kidney disease to try and justify why her complete lack of training in any relevant field of immunology or vaccines doesn't disqualify her as an "expert" on the topic.

In 2010 Humphries announced she had embraced homeopathy, having studied it for four years. Her level of homeopathic certification is unclear - she is repeatedly referred to as being "at the end of her studies."[3][4] As part of Humphries's embrace of homeopathy, she swallowed the kool-aid of a very extreme version of vitalism and goes around the internet claiming that homeopathy works by fixing energy flows in the body.[5]. Humphries claims that homeopathy is a "more advanced system" than evidence based modern medicine; she states that "allopathic" medicine tends to exacerbate the forces that drive chronic illness.[5].

She recommends that people limit their medical care only to homeopaths, chiropractors, and osteopaths. Despite this, she still appears to be working her day job as a nephrologist at the Northeast Nephrology Clinic in Bangor, Maine.

On NaturalNews she has expressed frustration that her edits to this page keep getting reverted, and "they put back their lies right away" and "at least half the information on there about me is completely falsified."[6]

She has also attempted to combine anti-vax sentiment with poorly-thought-out religious gobbledygook (i.e., lies purportedly based on scripture) in an effort to convince somebody that the Bible and Koran are opposed to vaccination. Pull the other leg, please.[7]

http://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Suzanne_Humphries
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by bumblebee View Post
"I lack skillz"
Bevo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 12:05 PM   #8
jetcycles
Repeat Offender
 
jetcycles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: ShoreAcres
Feedback Rating: (15)
Posts: 12,442

Experience: 10+ years

Bike(s):
1950 Chevy Deluxe
1980 Honda CT70
1987 Kawasaki 650SX
1996 Honda Z50






Send a message via AIM to jetcycles
Bevo, I don't say this often. . .but rock on! The OP is just as much of a quack as the kidney doctor presenting anti vaccine propaganda in the video. Totally. . KooKoo.
__________________
I understand the consequences of my actions prior to engaging in those actions. . .there are certain situations in life where the risk is totally worth the reward.
jetcycles is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 12:07 PM   #9
Bevo
Hook 'em!
 
Bevo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Houston-The South Loop
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 25,744

Experience: 10+ years
Trackdays: 3

Bike(s):
'17 CBR1000S1 Tricolor
'14 CB1000R Matte Gray
'12 CBR1000RR (sold)
'10 CBR1000RR (destroyed)
'09 CBR1000RR C-ABS (sold)

Member Garage





Quote:
Originally Posted by jetcycles View Post
I bet she's had vaccinations.
Many lesbians don't like being penetrated
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by bumblebee View Post
"I lack skillz"
Bevo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 12:18 PM   #10
Chubby Racer
The Confusion
 
Chubby Racer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: between a chair and a screen
Feedback Rating: (2)
Posts: 19,409

Experience: 8 years
Trackdays: 10+

Bike(s):
'07 R6
'02 KLX110(tarded)








Send a message via ICQ to Chubby Racer Send a message via AIM to Chubby Racer Send a message via MSN to Chubby Racer Send a message via Yahoo to Chubby Racer
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jae View Post
I agree that vaccinations are evil tricks by satan to get us to abandon our faith in 's healing power, and only He can save us from this plague of illness.
amen!

You just gave me a jesusboner. Wait...is that sacrilegious?
__________________
A motorcycle is a joy machine. It's a machine of wonders, a metal bird, a motorized prosthetic. It's light and dark and shiny and dirty and warm and cold lapping over each other; it's a conduit of grace, it's a catalyst for bonding the gritty and the holy.

CMRA #302
Chubby Racer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 12:24 PM   #11
Jae
Kilted Basterd
 
Jae's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Cypress
Feedback Rating: (9)
Posts: 5,163

Experience: 10+ years

Bike(s):
'08 GSX-R 600 (for sale, inquire within)
'08 Hypermotard (borrowed, ATM)
Russian POS ??


Member Garage


Quote:
Originally Posted by Chubby Racer View Post
amen!

You just gave me a jesusboner. Wait...is that sacrilegious?


Why can't we "thank" posts in this section?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bevo View Post
Suzanne Humphries From RationalWiki

Suzanne Humphries is a nephrologist (kidney doctor) who has recently (as of 2011) become a vocal proponent of pseudoscience and quack medicine. Humphries has been involved with the International Medical Council on Vaccination, a front group for vaccine hysteria, and is a signer of the organization's anti-vax Project Steve petition. She has written several blog posts and done several podcasts and interviews insinuating that kidney failure is caused by vaccines.[1][2] Humphries uses this purely anecdotal, unstudied, "feeling" of vaccines' role in kidney disease to try and justify why her complete lack of training in any relevant field of immunology or vaccines doesn't disqualify her as an "expert" on the topic.
...
Hey, I'm convinced she knows what she's talking about. She's written several blog posts, and they don't let just anyone do that on the internet. She must be an expert.
__________________
Keeping the "F-U" in "fun"
Jae is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 12:25 PM   #12
Bevo
Hook 'em!
 
Bevo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Houston-The South Loop
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 25,744

Experience: 10+ years
Trackdays: 3

Bike(s):
'17 CBR1000S1 Tricolor
'14 CB1000R Matte Gray
'12 CBR1000RR (sold)
'10 CBR1000RR (destroyed)
'09 CBR1000RR C-ABS (sold)

Member Garage





Quote:
Originally Posted by Jae View Post


Why can't we "thank" posts in this section?
This section has been vaccinated against "thanks"
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by bumblebee View Post
"I lack skillz"
Bevo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 12:33 PM   #13
Petro
C'Mon... Building 7
 
Petro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Feedback Rating: (2)
Posts: 10,160

Experience: 10+ years











Quote:
Originally Posted by Bevo View Post
Dr. Suzanne Humphries and the International Medical Council on Vaccination: Antivaccine to the core

Posted by Orac on February 16, 2011

A couple of weeks ago, I had a bit of fun with a position statement by the International Medical Council on Vaccination (IMCV), which I called, in my own inimitable fashion, The clueless cite the ignorant to argue against vaccines. That’s exactly what it was, too, some truly clueless anti-vaccinationists arguing against vaccines and bolstering their argument with a hilariously pathetic list of signatories, among which were noted anti-vaccine activists, chiropractors, homeopaths, and other dubious practitioners totaling only between 80-90. Among those signatories was a woman named Suzanne Humphries, MD. We’ve dealt with Dr. Humphries before when she expressed anger at being called a quack and warning us pharma shills and minions that the “revolution has begun.”

Oooh. Scary.

This time around, Dr. Humphries has decided to tell us A Few Things I Know. Unfortunately for her, those “few things” she knows are precious few, and they are all wrong. But before we can deal with what Dr. Humphries thinks she knows, we first have to deal with her naked assertion of her medical credentials. In essence, Dr. Humphries begins with an argument from authority:

I am a Medical Doctor with credentials in internal medicine and nephrology (kidneys). I received a bachelor’s degree in theoretical physics in 1987 from Rutgers University. I mention the college degree in case any doubtful readers question my mental prowess. One can doubt my intellectual ability less if they first realize that I know how to figure out difficult things. I know how to look at something in depth for many hours or days until I understand the inner workings of it. This is what I learned to do in college. In fact the strenuous mind-bending exercise that was part of the physics curriculum made medical school easy. I found the study of the human body, chemistry and biology to be in comparison quite shallow, simple and easy to comprehend.

As someone who comes from a strong basic science background, having been a chemistry major (who graduated with honors–so, there!), I think I can see Dr. Humphries’ problem. First, she seems unduly proud of her science background, wielding it like a talisman against charges that she doesn’t know what she’s talking about (which she doesn’t). Unfortunately, as those of us in medicine know, what you did 25 or more years ago in college has little bearing on what you can or can’t understand now. I can also see a bit of arrogance there, too. Let’s put it this way. I took advanced physical chemistry, graduate level biochemistry, and upper level physics, but I didn’t find medical school easy at all. One reason was that medical school required a whole lot of memorization in addition to basic science. Unfortunately, having been used to learning general principles and then applying them to problems, I found the memorization required to be rather difficult. Another problem I encountered was that, unlike chemistry and biochemical assays, I had trouble dealing with the ambiguity of medicine, of synthesizing incomplete and sometimes ambiguous clinical information in the form of patient histories, physical examinations, lab values, and tests and then applying what I had learned about the science of medicine to them. “Shades of gray” would be a good term to describe it, and I was used to more black and white. It took a major change in mindset before I began to understand. That change in mindset wasn’t easy, and it didn’t take overnight. Dr. Humphries’ problem is that she sounds as though she never changed her mindset from physics to medicine–and is proud of it.

Next up, Dr. Humphries assures us that she spent two years working in a biochemistry laboratory as a head technician. I’ll go her one better, if that’s the direction she wants to go. Not only have I been a technician, but I have also been a graduate student in a translational research laborotory, a postoctoral fellow, and now a medical researcher for the last 12 years in his own laboratory. As such, I would guess that I probably know more about how research is done than Dr. Humphries. Even so, it’s also probably irrelvant, because it’s the quality of one’s arguments that should rule, and, quite frankly, Dr. Humphries has become a homeopath. To embrace homeopathy, as far as I’m concerned, means throwing away all that knowledge of physics that tells us that homeopathy is nothing more than pseudoscience based on a mixture of prescientific beliefs drawing from the principles of sympathetic magic. In any case, I find it instructive to look at Dr. Humphries’ “conversion story,” but first we have to listen to her tell us again how awesome she is and how open-minded, too:

I have spent four years teaching internal medicine and nephrology to medical students, residents and advanced fellows in training at a university hospital as an assistant professor. During that time, reading over and critiquing dozens of journal articles was a part of everyday life. Suffice it to say, my past experiences have put me in good standing to look into the problems with vaccines and make certain determinations. Like most doctors, I held a blind belief for many years, that vaccines were necessary, safe and effective. Like most doctors, I never lifted a page to seek out any other truth for myself. But unlike most doctors, I have no stake in upholding false paradigms and I am no longer indebted to the government for hundreds of thousands of dollars. Unlike most doctors, I have the means to survive with or without my medical license because I have sought out another education to support myself in case of worst case scenario.

Do you get it? Dr. Humphries is a Seeker of The Truth, man! And don’t you forget it! She don’t need no stinkin’ pharmaceutical drugs, and she don’t need no “conventional medicine,” either! She spits on Lord Draconis Zeneca‘s scaly hide. (She will come to regret that, actually. Our benevolent scaly pharma overlord will make sure of it, I’m certain.) I also love how she refers to “the truth,” as in, “The Truth? You can’t handle The Truth?” I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again, science is not about the truth (or The Truth). It’s about evidence and data and what can be observed. It’s about models, explanations, and theories that explain current observations and make predictions. All “truths” in science are provisional. If the evidence doesn’t support a model anymore, scientists abandon it in favor of a model that better explains the existing evidence. But it’s all about The Truth to Dr. Humphries:

Up until 2 years ago I was content to work as a medical doctor caring for very sick people with kidney failure. Two years ago, everything changed. With several undeniable cases of kidney-associated vaccine injury in previously healthy people, I started to look deeper into the information that I had previously held as factual and not worthy of debate. I started to study vaccines, their components, and the science behind the statements of safety and effectiveness. From there an avalanche of truth collapsed upon me and I will never be the same. In fact, nothing I look at will ever be the same. Chronic degenerative diseases, kidney failure, autoimmune diseases and powers of authority will never look the same to me again. There are certain things that I can now say with no uncertainty.

An “avalanche of truth”? Wow! Is that like a “tsunami of autism”? Still, I have no doubt that Dr. Humphries will never be the same. She has, after all, become a homeopath. If she used to practice science-based medicine before she turned to woo, then, yes, her life has changed, and she will never be the same. That’s not always a good thing. In Dr. Humphrie’s case, it certainly is not. Still, I’m curious about these cases of “kidney-associated vaccine injury.” She doesn’t elaborate, and, quite frankly, I didn’t have time to watch this video last night, where she apparently makes the same claim. Oh, never mind, it’s close to the beginning of the video. Dr. Humphries states that back in the winter of 2009 she saw several cases of fulminant kidney failure in patients who had had their seasonal flu vaccine and their H1N1 vaccine. In some cases these cases were up to six weeks after vaccination.

Six weeks? Gee. With millions of people being vaccinated against H1N1, what do you think the odds are of seeing a few cases of patients in fulminant kidney failure that began sometime within the six weeks after they had been vaccinated? Pretty high, I’d guess. Probably pretty close to 100%, given the frequency of vaccination against the flu, particularly among the elderly, who are more prone to kidney failure, and the incidence of kidney failure. It’s a perfect example of confusing correlation with causation. She even goes so far as to say that she thinks “idiopathic” cases of kidney failure are really due to vaccines.

That’s because, to the anti-vaccine loon, it’s always about the vaccines. Always. Maybe later this week I’ll have a chance to go through the whole video. Or maybe not.

So, what are the “few things” (the very few things) that Dr. Humphries knows? Let’s take a look:

Vaccines did not save humanity and never will.

No one ever said they did, but they sure have reduced the rates of infectious disease and saved millions upon millions of lives.
The writer here is nothing more than a blogger Not a medical doctor.
Petro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 12:34 PM   #14
jetcycles
Repeat Offender
 
jetcycles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: ShoreAcres
Feedback Rating: (15)
Posts: 12,442

Experience: 10+ years

Bike(s):
1950 Chevy Deluxe
1980 Honda CT70
1987 Kawasaki 650SX
1996 Honda Z50






Send a message via AIM to jetcycles
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jae View Post


Why can't we "thank" posts in this section?



Hey, I'm convinced she knows what she's talking about. She's written several blog posts, and they don't let just anyone do that on the internet. She must be an expert.
__________________
I understand the consequences of my actions prior to engaging in those actions. . .there are certain situations in life where the risk is totally worth the reward.
jetcycles is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 12:36 PM   #15
Petro
C'Mon... Building 7
 
Petro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Feedback Rating: (2)
Posts: 10,160

Experience: 10+ years











Unless this is Orac?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Gorski
Petro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 12:41 PM   #16
Bevo
Hook 'em!
 
Bevo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Houston-The South Loop
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 25,744

Experience: 10+ years
Trackdays: 3

Bike(s):
'17 CBR1000S1 Tricolor
'14 CB1000R Matte Gray
'12 CBR1000RR (sold)
'10 CBR1000RR (destroyed)
'09 CBR1000RR C-ABS (sold)

Member Garage





Quote:
Originally Posted by Petro View Post
The writer here is nothing more than a blogger Not a medical doctor.
I figured a blogger would carry more weight with you than a medical doctor

AMIRIGHT?
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by bumblebee View Post
"I lack skillz"
Bevo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 12:44 PM   #17
bluewave18
Safety Third
 
bluewave18's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: S.E.
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 34,820

Experience: 10+ years

Bike(s):
08 Busa
03 XR 50








those evil needles too
bluewave18 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 12:57 PM   #18
Jae
Kilted Basterd
 
Jae's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Cypress
Feedback Rating: (9)
Posts: 5,163

Experience: 10+ years

Bike(s):
'08 GSX-R 600 (for sale, inquire within)
'08 Hypermotard (borrowed, ATM)
Russian POS ??


Member Garage


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bevo View Post
This section has been vaccinated against "thanks"
Is that why it's generally potato?
__________________
Keeping the "F-U" in "fun"
Jae is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 01:00 PM   #19
bluewave18
Safety Third
 
bluewave18's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: S.E.
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 34,820

Experience: 10+ years

Bike(s):
08 Busa
03 XR 50








Lets get Shellnuts's opinion on this.
bluewave18 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 01:03 PM   #20
Jae
Kilted Basterd
 
Jae's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Cypress
Feedback Rating: (9)
Posts: 5,163

Experience: 10+ years

Bike(s):
'08 GSX-R 600 (for sale, inquire within)
'08 Hypermotard (borrowed, ATM)
Russian POS ??


Member Garage


Quote:
Originally Posted by Petro View Post
The writer here is nothing more than a blogger Not a medical doctor.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bevo View Post
Dr. Suzanne Humphries and the International Medical Council on Vaccination: Antivaccine to the core

Posted by Orac on February 16, 2011

...
As someone who comes from a strong basic science background, having been a chemistry major (who graduated with honors–so, there!), ... Unfortunately, as those of us in medicine know... I took advanced physical chemistry, graduate level biochemistry, and upper level physics, but I didn’t find medical school easy at all. One reason was that medical school required a whole lot of memorization in addition to basic science. Unfortunately, having been used to learning general principles and then applying them to problems, I found the memorization required to be rather difficult. Another problem I encountered was that, unlike chemistry and biochemical assays, I had trouble dealing with the ambiguity of medicine, of synthesizing incomplete and sometimes ambiguous clinical information in the form of patient histories, physical examinations, lab values, and tests and then applying what I had learned about the science of medicine to them. “Shades of gray” would be a good term to describe it, and I was used to more black and white. It took a major change in mindset before I began to understand. That change in mindset wasn’t easy, and it didn’t take overnight. Dr. Humphries’ problem is that she sounds as though she never changed her mindset from physics to medicine–and is proud of it.

...Not only have I been a technician, but I have also been a graduate student in a translational research laborotory, a postoctoral fellow, and now a medical researcher for the last 12 years in his own laboratory. As such, I would guess that I probably know more about how research is done than Dr. Humphries....
So citing the difficulties experienced in medical school vs. more concrete sciences implies to me (as if stating going to medical school wasn't enough) that he has medical training, as does working as a medical researcher for 12 years. Also, he wrote a blog post. To me, he has at least as much credibility as she does, because he's published on the internet.
__________________
Keeping the "F-U" in "fun"
Jae is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Advertisement


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:41 PM.


MotoHouston.com is not responsible for the content posted by users.
Privacy Policy