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Old 02-25-2009, 10:57 PM   #1
elephant head
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Slowing in a turn.

So I was driving (my truck to school) and from 59N to I-10west there is a long winding turn. As I was coming around the turn, the cars in front of me started to slow down, it made me wonder, how do I slow down in a turn like that on a bike? In MSF they tell you to Slow, Look, Press and Roll, but they never said anything about slowing down in a turn. They did teach us how to emergency stop while in a turn though. But I was looking for more slowing in a turn, granted that you slowed to the best entry speed.

I read somewhere on msfgroup.org that you can use engine braking or slightly the rear brake. Can someone chime in?
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Old 02-25-2009, 11:09 PM   #2
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Thats why you slow down and get to the speed that you want before you enter the turn.

Or if your in the turn let go of the gas and keep pushing on the bars if you need to push more dont be afraid...

P.S nice avatar!!! !
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Old 02-25-2009, 11:12 PM   #3
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let go of the throttle and gently apply front brake and/or rear brake slightly. How hard can it be to park in the turns? I have seen plenty of noobs at the track doing this, me included.
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Old 02-25-2009, 11:21 PM   #4
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You should have downshifted before turn with rpm's way up, roll off throttle to engine brake and at same time apply brakes gently.
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Old 02-25-2009, 11:25 PM   #5
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Awesome, I figured it was just that easy
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Old 02-25-2009, 11:36 PM   #6
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That's the one thing I think MSF doesn't really teach well. They only teach for best case scenarios.
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Old 02-26-2009, 10:06 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Intermission View Post
That's the one thing I think MSF doesn't really teach well. They only teach for best case scenarios.
Agreed, and max speed 20 mph at that. Still, the low speed handling and swerving is valuable for side street riding.
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Old 02-26-2009, 12:26 PM   #8
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The MSF video I watch (see it occasionally) says something along the lines of applying brakes gradually as you bring the bike upright, making sure your handlebars are square as you come to a stop. I always use the freeway interchange ramp as a specific example of this after the range exercise for stopping quickly in a curve.
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Old 02-26-2009, 12:32 PM   #9
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don't be afraid to use the brakes in a turn.
Just be smooth with your actions.
If you stab the brakes, you have a better chance of breaking the tires loose.
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Old 02-26-2009, 12:43 PM   #10
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Quote:
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don't be afraid to use the brakes in a turn.
Just be smooth with your actions.
If you stab the brakes, you have a better chance of breaking the tires loose.
... but if you need to stop quickly, get the bike upright before you go for full braking. If you apply brakes while leaned over, the feedback that you weren't smooth enough is usually an immediate smack on the pavement.
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Old 02-26-2009, 12:46 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Angamico View Post
... but if you need to stop quickly, get the bike upright before you go for full braking. If you apply brakes while leaned over, the feedback that you weren't smooth enough is usually an immediate smack on the pavement.

Yes, forgot to add that. Thanks.
Always leave yourself room if possible.
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Old 02-26-2009, 12:52 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scorpio View Post
Yes, forgot to add that. Thanks.
Always leave yourself room if possible.
So did I (in my original post).


Another place you will find you need to slow in corners is downtown. Dang pedestrians are always exercising their right of way to cross with the light while I'm cornering!
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Old 02-26-2009, 01:11 PM   #13
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The term is trail braking; not recommended on the streets but useful when necessary.
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Old 02-26-2009, 01:27 PM   #14
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usually right the bike as much as possible (straighten up), engine brake (roll off throttle), and apply front brake (not a fistful, but let her know who daddy is!) as needed...no cookie cutter design as each curve/stop will be different...just need to practice - suggest a parking lot (empty)

Have you experienced an emergency stop in a straightaway at 30mph? 50mph? *in a controlled environment* Work on that first, then go into the turn scenario and apply what you just practiced.

Last edited by Bean; 02-26-2009 at 01:28 PM. Reason: x
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Old 02-26-2009, 01:37 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scorpio View Post
don't be afraid to use the brakes in a turn.
Just be smooth with your actions.
If you stab the brakes, you have a better chance of breaking the tires loose.
Does it matter which brake?
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Old 02-26-2009, 01:55 PM   #16
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In www.sportrider.com April 2009 issue on page 88 is a good article about CONTROLLING YOUR ARC WITH THE THROTTLE...

I still have problems with cornering, after my go done last year.
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Old 02-26-2009, 01:58 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bean View Post
usually right the bike as much as possible (straighten up), engine brake (roll off throttle), and apply front brake (not a fistful, but let her know who daddy is!) as needed...no cookie cutter design as each curve/stop will be different...just need to practice - suggest a parking lot (empty)

Have you experienced an emergency stop in a straightaway at 30mph? 50mph? *in a controlled environment* Work on that first, then go into the turn scenario and apply what you just practiced.
i like his answer da best!
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Old 03-12-2009, 10:02 AM   #18
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Gradually is the key word. Don't just muscle it or you will be having a not so friendly chat with Mr. Pavement. You hit the rear too hard it will slide out and you will be fishtailing or eating pavement. The front too hard and you will typically go directly into the ground. I like to lightly drag the rear and gradually tighten on the front as i bring the bike as upright as possible. IF that ain't doin i use the rear more, Im more comfortable with fishtailing so long as the grade of the turn isn't steep. All this while engine braking.
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Old 03-12-2009, 04:33 PM   #19
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Try not to chop the throttle or jump on the brakes. Letting off the gas puts more weight on the front tire that is loaded pretty well already. You want the bike to stay as stable as possible while leaned over. If you are in the corner with the gas lightly on, you can smoothly apply either brake (I prefer the front as I have a better feel), without letting off the gas. You shouldn't be coasting into and thru turns anyhow.... set your entry speed then use a light, steady "maintenance" throttle to maintain the speed in the corner. Basic physics will cause the bike to slow down if you are off the gas....

One thing you will immediately note if you brake is the bike will want to stand up and go straight. You can use some countersteer to continue the turn, while braking smoothly.

This is something you have to practice and get comfortable with. Don't wait until it is a panic situation and then try to learn.

It also goes hand in hand with learning the habit of riding with a couple fingers on the brake and clutch... the definition of habits is things you do without extra thought process.
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Old 03-12-2009, 04:36 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bean View Post
usually right the bike as much as possible (straighten up), engine brake (roll off throttle), and apply front brake (not a fistful, but let her know who daddy is!) as needed...no cookie cutter design as each curve/stop will be different...just need to practice - suggest a parking lot (empty)

Have you experienced an emergency stop in a straightaway at 30mph? 50mph? *in a controlled environment* Work on that first, then go into the turn scenario and apply what you just practiced.
who was your maestro? Sounds like you know what you're talking about

Now let's get that M class thing out of the way already.
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