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Old 01-19-2009, 12:52 PM   #1
SexualChocolate
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Exclamation Key notes in event of an accident or emergency happens on a ride

OK let’s go through some things...

First the definitions.

First Responder - A person trained in emergency care that may be called on to give such care as a routine part of his or her job.

Citizen Responder - A layperson (someone who does not have special training or skill) who recognizes an emergency and decides to act.

Life Threatening Emergency – An illness or injury that impairs a victim’s ability to circulate oxygenated blood to all parts of his or her body.

Non-life Threatening Emergency – A situation that does not have an immediate impact on a victim’s ability to circulate oxygenated blood, but still requires medical attention.

Primary Role of a Citizen Responder:
Recognizing that an emergency exists.
Deciding to act.
Taking action by calling 9-1-1 or the local emergency number.
Giving care until medical help arrives.

Recognizing Emergencies:
Unusual Noises – screams, yells, moans, or calls for help. Breaking glass, crashing metal, screeching tires. Sudden, loud or unidentifiable sounds. Unusual silence.
Unusual Sights – stopped vehicle on the side of the road. Sparks, smoke, or fire.
Unusual Odors – Odors that are stronger than usual. Unrecognizable odors. Inappropriate odors.
Unusual Appearance or Behavior – Unconsciousness. Confused or unusual behavior. Trouble breathing. Clutching chest or throat. Slurred, confused, or hesitant speech. Unexplainable confusion or drowsiness. Sweating for no apparent reason. Uncharacteristic skin color. Inability to move a body part.

DECIDING TO ACT:
Once you recognize thaqt an emergency has occurred, you must decide to act. Calling 9-1-1 or the local emergency number is the most important action you and other citizen responders can take. Early arrival of EMS personnel increases the victim’s chances of surviving life-threatening emergency.

OVERCOMING BARRIERS TO ACTION:
Sometimes people simply do not recognize that an emergency has occurred. AT other times, people recognize an emergency but are reluctant to act. People have various reasons for hesitating or not acting. These reasons are called barriers to action. Common reasons people give for not acting include-
The presence of bystanders
Uncertainty about the victim
The nature of the injury or illness
Fear of disease transmission
Fear of not knowing what to do or of doing something wrong

Presence of Bystanders
Bystanders can cause confusion at an emergency scene. It may not be easy to tell if anyone is giving first aid. In every emergency situation you should always ask if help is needed. DO NOT ASSUME, just because a crowd is gathered, that someone is caring for the victim. If someone else is already giving care, offer to help. Sometimes you may need to ask bystanders who are not helping to back away and give the victim and responders’ ample space.
Bystanders can be of great help in an emergency. YOU CAN ASK then to call for, meet, and direct the ambulance; keep the area free of unnecessary traffic; or help you give first aid. You might send them for blankets or other supplies. Bystanders may have valuable information about what happened or may know the victims medical history. Bystanders can also help comfort the victim and others at the scene.
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Old 01-19-2009, 12:54 PM   #2
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TAKING ACTION
As a citizen responder, you are responsible for activating the emergency medical services (EMS) system by calling 9-1-1 or the local emergency number.

WHEN TOU CALL 9-1-1
When you call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number, your call will be automatically routed to the police, fire, or EMS system. When your call is answered, you will talk to an emergency call taker who has had special training in dealing with crises over the phone. The call taker will ask you for a phone number and address of the emergency and will ask other key questions to determine whether you need police, fire, or EMS assistance. It may seem that the call taker asks a lot of questions. The information you give helps the dispatcher send the type of help needed, based on the severity of the emergency. When using a mobile phone to cal 9-1-1, it is important to know that the system that identifies a caller’s location and telephone number is still in its infancy and is not available everywhere. Therefore, you should tell the call taker the location of the emergency and you mobile phone number in case you are disconnected.

UNTIL HELP ARRIVES:
There may be actions you, other citizen responders, or bystanders can take before EMS personnel arrive. Always follow the pre-arrival instructions provided by the call taker. These instructions may range from taking actions that make the scene safer and more accessible to EMS personnel to giving more advanced care.

EMERGENCY ACTION STEPS
The emergency actions steps are three steps you should take in an emergency. These steps are-
CHECK the scene and the victim
- Is the scene safe?
- What happened?
- How many victims are there?
- Are bystanders available to help?
CALL 9-1-1 or the local emergency number
CARE for the victim

WHEN CHECKING THE VICTIM
Do not move the victim unless he or she is in immediate danger. Tell the victim not to move if no immediate danger is present. Also tell bystanders not to move the victim.

WHEN TO CALL
At times you may be uncertain when to activate the EMS system.
As a general rule, call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number if the victim
- Is unconscious or has an altered level of consciousness
- Has trouble breathing or is breathing in a strange manner
- Has chest discomfort, pain, or pressure that persists for more than 3 to 5 minutes or goes away and comes back
- Is bleeding severely
- Has pressure or pain in the abdomen that does not go away
- IS vomiting or passing blood
- Has a seizure that lasts more than 5 minutes or has multiple seizures
- Has a seizure and is pregnant
- Has a seizure and is diabetic
- Has severe headache or slurred speech
- Appears to be poisoned
- Has injuries to the head, neck, or back
- Has possible broken bones

CALL
As a citizen responder, you top priority is to ensure that the victim receives more advanced care as soon as possible.

CARE FOR THE VICTIM
Once you have checked the scene and the victim, you may need to give care. Always care for life threatening conditions before those that are not life threatening. While you are waiting for more advanced medical help, watch for changes in the victim’s level of consciousness and breathing. A change in the victim’s condition may be a signal of a serious injury or illness. A condition that may not appear serious at first may become serious with time. Help the victim rest comfortably, and keep him or her from getting chilled or overheated. Reassure the victim.

IN SUMMARY
Emergency situations are often confusing and frightening. TO take appropriate actions in any emergency follow the three basic emergency action steps: CHECK – CALL – CARE.
CHECK the scene and the victim
CALL 9-1-1 or the local emergency number to activate the EMS system
CARE for the victim until more advanced medical personnel arrive.
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Old 01-19-2009, 12:54 PM   #3
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very very very good list/guide
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Old 01-19-2009, 12:55 PM   #4
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great write up . stickkkyyy
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Old 01-19-2009, 01:11 PM   #5
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Riaz, this needs to be stickied.

One piece of advice that desperately needs to be heeded: stay calm. One of the worst things you can do to a victim is to agitate them with your excitement. If you cannot be and stay calm, have someone who is interact with the patient.

Something else that may assist EMS is information. For example when checking for an altered state of consciousness, make note of anything that seems amiss. Does the person react to physical stimuli, do the pupils look uneven with regards to size, is the patient unaware of where they are... If you know how to take pulse, what is it and what time did you take it. These are the sort of things that help EMS survey and assess the situation/patient.
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Old 01-19-2009, 03:35 PM   #6
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excellent write up STiCKY for sure
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Old 01-19-2009, 03:48 PM   #7
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very good info, thanks for the writeup!
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Old 01-20-2009, 02:47 PM   #8
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you make sticky now!!!!!
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Old 01-20-2009, 02:59 PM   #9
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itza sticky
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Old 01-20-2009, 04:25 PM   #10
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great SC thanx for taking the time to gather that and post it.
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