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Old 09-05-2008, 08:41 PM   #1
jodyhudson
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Yamaha adopts Ohlins active suspension for Donnington World Superbike race

Yamaha Ohlins Active suspension

The Yamaha Motor Italia Superbike World Championship team will debut a new Öhlins active suspension system at Donnington Park this weekend. It will be the first team to ever race with active suspension. Much simpler than it sounds, the system essentially uses computer-controlled servos to adjust the external rebound and compression screws on Öhlins’ top of the range TTX shock and forks on the fly. If that sounds a bit jerry-rigged, you’re not alone, but it could give the team a crucial advantage.

Racing at Donnington carries with it a notorious compromise in suspension set up. Half of the circuit is composed of wide, sweeping curves requiring high speed stability at maximum lean angles, while the other half is made up of tight hairpins that require heavy braking, then massive acceleration, both carried out while the bike is completely upright. Active suspension could make a bike more stable at speed, allow squat under acceleration for better traction, while helping to keep both wheels planted under heavy braking, all independently optimized for each corner.

The Öhlins system will take advantage of existing onboard computers that measure suspension travel, three-axis acceleration (acceleration, deceleration and cornering) and track position, then use that data to determine which damping settings are appropriate at specific moments. Stepper motors capable of adjusting the suspension one click at a time will then make instantaneous alterations to the rebound and compression damping.

The electronically controlled system is far less complex than true active suspension, which is capable of constantly moving the shock’s piston, as well as adjusting the damping, in response to bumps and performance needs in real time. Because Öhlins’ TTX suspension moves damping control to external adjusters mounted on the top of the shock and bottom of the forks, the company was able to create a system that retrofits to existing suspension.

Despite earlier trialing a similar system on the M1 MotoGP bike, Öhlins and Yamaha decided to debut it on the R1 SBK racer due to its similarity with the machines Öhlins does its own development on. If it proves successful this weekend and through the rest of the season, expect to see active suspension adopted in more race series and by more teams. Eventually, we could even see similar technology made available for road bikes.
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Old 09-05-2008, 10:02 PM   #2
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OMG!

Where have I been? How long have they had these things in existence? That's truly amazing.

I was wondering when they would start using e-controlled suspensions that could adjust to specific track positions.

Anyone else game for flying to England and snatching one of those from the paddock???
........
...............
......................

.........seriously.....anyone?
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Old 09-06-2008, 07:21 AM   #3
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Its cool! With systems like this, and others like ABS. I sure hope the manufactures consider the portion of sport bikes sold into track duty. I hate to see them complicate the bike platforms to the point you cant strip them down easily for race or track purposes. In this case the technology is for a race application. However, you know once they get it into production form of any kind, the systems will be watered down to some law suit avoidance system, for first-time rides, that just gets in the way.


The new CBR's will ship with ABS in 09. Do you think ABS will be good at the track, or something you would delete off the bike for track use?

Last edited by Turnerscasa; 09-06-2008 at 07:24 AM.
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Old 09-06-2008, 08:11 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by jodyhudson View Post
Yamaha Ohlins Active suspension

The Yamaha Motor Italia Superbike World Championship team will debut a new Öhlins active suspension system at Donnington Park this weekend. It will be the first team to ever race with active suspension. Much simpler than it sounds, the system essentially uses computer-controlled servos to adjust the external rebound and compression screws on Öhlins’ top of the range TTX shock and forks on the fly. If that sounds a bit jerry-rigged, you’re not alone, but it could give the team a crucial advantage.

Racing at Donnington carries with it a notorious compromise in suspension set up. Half of the circuit is composed of wide, sweeping curves requiring high speed stability at maximum lean angles, while the other half is made up of tight hairpins that require heavy braking, then massive acceleration, both carried out while the bike is completely upright. Active suspension could make a bike more stable at speed, allow squat under acceleration for better traction, while helping to keep both wheels planted under heavy braking, all independently optimized for each corner.

The Öhlins system will take advantage of existing onboard computers that measure suspension travel, three-axis acceleration (acceleration, deceleration and cornering) and track position, then use that data to determine which damping settings are appropriate at specific moments. Stepper motors capable of adjusting the suspension one click at a time will then make instantaneous alterations to the rebound and compression damping.

The electronically controlled system is far less complex than true active suspension, which is capable of constantly moving the shock’s piston, as well as adjusting the damping, in response to bumps and performance needs in real time. Because Öhlins’ TTX suspension moves damping control to external adjusters mounted on the top of the shock and bottom of the forks, the company was able to create a system that retrofits to existing suspension.

Despite earlier trialing a similar system on the M1 MotoGP bike, Öhlins and Yamaha decided to debut it on the R1 SBK racer due to its similarity with the machines Öhlins does its own development on. If it proves successful this weekend and through the rest of the season, expect to see active suspension adopted in more race series and by more teams. Eventually, we could even see similar technology made available for road bikes.
I admire the technology but IMO it's just another example of the "electronics" that are ruining the sport.
it widens the gap between the have and the have nots, remember that Yamaha own Ohlins!!
where's it going to stop???
why not fit an ABS system linked to lean angle, tyre speed, front dive etc so that you can NEVER lose the front
or a GPS system linked to lean angle, attitude etc that opens the throttle for you at the earliest calculated moment
the way it's going is similar to the F1 cars where people cheer if they see one overtake all race
In a way I hope it just doesn't work!!!!
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Old 09-06-2008, 08:25 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grinchy View Post
I admire the technology but IMO it's just another example of the "electronics" that are ruining the sport.
it widens the gap between the have and the have nots, remember that Yamaha own Ohlins!!
where's it going to stop???
why not fit an ABS system linked to lean angle, tyre speed, front dive etc so that you can NEVER lose the front
or a GPS system linked to lean angle, attitude etc that opens the throttle for you at the earliest calculated moment
the way it's going is similar to the F1 cars where people cheer if they see one overtake all race
In a way I hope it just doesn't work!!!!
GPS would be off by atleast 3 ft... wouldnt want it opening too soon
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Old 09-06-2008, 08:33 AM   #6
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GPS would be off by atleast 3 ft... wouldnt want it opening too soon

if it does the "electronics" will control it and the "vario computer controlled seat" will automatically move his weight into the most appropriate position, the 360 degree radar will then "sense" another rider trying to take advantage of this small glitch and via fly by wire steering will correct the line to block the pass
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Old 09-06-2008, 08:38 AM   #7
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The new CBR's will ship with ABS in 09. Do you think ABS will be good at the track, or something you would delete off the bike for track use?

I have ABS on my C-14 street bike and it’s a good thing to have in the rain. After 27 K on that thing I only needed it once but have played with it a lot. It works very well. I see no use in it on the track other than if you want to use your rear and not lock it up. Maybe also useful if you run off and use your front in the grass, but then you're not ON the track. I don’t see any benefit from it on the front while you’re on a dry track. I think if you’ve gone so far as to activate it, you’d already be too screwed for it to bail you out. Racers in the rain? Maybe, but the already be too screwed theory applies there too. Removing it? Only for weight savings, if you ride right it never comes into play.
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Old 09-06-2008, 11:15 AM   #8
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wow thats interesting...didnt yamaha aquire ohlins not too long ago?
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Old 09-06-2008, 11:18 AM   #9
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http://www.allbusiness.com/manufactu...6670857-1.html
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Old 09-06-2008, 11:33 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Turnerscasa View Post
The new CBR's will ship with ABS in 09. Do you think ABS will be good at the track, or something you would delete off the bike for track use?
i dont think id need abs, but since it has abs it has wheel speed sensors on both wheels witch would make it possible to have "real" traction control. right now ama supersport and superstock rules say no data acquisition witch limits teams to using rmp rate-of-rise tc systems like the bazzaz tc kit.since this bike comes with data acq. from the factory we could get full traction control in the supersport class.
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