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Old 04-25-2008, 12:45 PM   #1
alrova
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are you 23 never raced and dream of being a Factory rider??

It is posible just check Troy Bayliss story for those who don't know it already. hey Tony, you are in the right path......

In his quiet, affable way, Bayliss explains how he turned a club racing career in Australia into a Ducati Corse World Superbike ride:

"I was a spray painter for ten years. I did my apprenticeship... I was 17 or 18, and did ten years of spray painting in the same place.

"I always new I was pretty good on a motorbike because I used to race junior motocross when I was about ten or 11, and I used to go really fast. I knew I was fast, I just never rode a motorcycle from when I was about 14 'til I was 23.

"That all started when I lost my license in the car, just for, you know ... being 17 and a bit silly. So I had to buy a bicycle to ride to work. I met this guy who actually races pushbikes (bicycles) for a living now, but he got me into bicycle riding. I would go out training every morning, and I'd ride past the motorbike shop and they had this ZXR750 staring at me through the window. For some reason, the bug bit me again. So I bought the bike and paid it off for a few years. That started me racing again. I had the bike for a couple of months and I thought, 'this is crazy on the road,' so I took it to a club race and off I went." Bayliss was 23 years old.

Once at the track and fitted with leathers and a number plate, Bayliss did something few new club racers do: he left the bike alone and just rode it, never changing anything but tires and fuel. He concentrated not on jetting or gearing or which tire works where, but just on going as humanly fast as he could go on that motorcycle. He learned that going six inches wide on the exit of this corner gave him another mile and a half on that straight; that it was pretty easy to pass other riders on the brakes; little lessons like that made him a better rider.

Of course, the fact that Bayliss and friends had no idea what they were doing helped.

Bayliss recalls, "I didn't have any car, so we used to take the back seat out of my father-in-law's van, put the bike in there and take it to the races. Me and (father-in-law) Max, we knew nothing about racing. All we did was put petrol in my bike and race."

Ignorance is bliss. "We'd be sitting in the pits, and look at all these riders working on their bikes, we'd look at each other and say, 'What are they doin'? Why are they workin' on their bikes all the time?'. It was quite funny."

Bayliss passed all the tests that fast club racers usually fail. He jumped up to the regional level, with more power and stiffer competition and still won. He started doing national level Supersport racing in Australia and went right to the front. That was a characteristic of his riding, that more times than not, really no matter what, he was at the front. Sometimes he won, sometimes he crashed and sometimes he finished back, but he was at the front time and again. A rider with that quality is hard to ignore even if he is too old to get a factory ride.

Then a man named Mat Mladin, who was riding for Kawasaki Australia, crashed an Ultralight airplane and cleaved his ankle and would sit out several races. Kawasaki needed a replacement rider and Bayliss, who not only has a good on-track record but a can-do attitude off, was chosen.

Though painful, Bayliss recalls what transpired, "I was racing 600 Supersport. Mat has an ultralight airplane, and he crashed and broke his leg. So I had a chance to race the Team Kawasaki bike. I qualified on the pole on my first time on the bike; I was dicing for the lead with one lap to go. I thought, 'I'm gonna win,' and that was it. I passed on the inside and hit the guy, fell off, and broke my wrist."

read the full story here

http://superbikeplanet.com/bayliss_2000_a.htm
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Old 04-25-2008, 01:56 PM   #2
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, sounds kinda like the beginning of my story.....been painting for a while.....lost my license for almost 2 years ....just started club racing last year.....

but i think that's almost the end of my racing career story
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Old 04-26-2008, 04:09 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alrova View Post
It is posible just check Troy Bayliss story for those who don't know it already. hey Tony, you are in the right path......

In his quiet, affable way, Bayliss explains how he turned a club racing career in Australia into a Ducati Corse World Superbike ride:

"I was a spray painter for ten years. I did my apprenticeship... I was 17 or 18, and did ten years of spray painting in the same place.

"I always new I was pretty good on a motorbike because I used to race junior motocross when I was about ten or 11, and I used to go really fast. I knew I was fast, I just never rode a motorcycle from when I was about 14 'til I was 23.

"That all started when I lost my license in the car, just for, you know ... being 17 and a bit silly. So I had to buy a bicycle to ride to work. I met this guy who actually races pushbikes (bicycles) for a living now, but he got me into bicycle riding. I would go out training every morning, and I'd ride past the motorbike shop and they had this ZXR750 staring at me through the window. For some reason, the bug bit me again. So I bought the bike and paid it off for a few years. That started me racing again. I had the bike for a couple of months and I thought, 'this is crazy on the road,' so I took it to a club race and off I went." Bayliss was 23 years old.

Once at the track and fitted with leathers and a number plate, Bayliss did something few new club racers do: he left the bike alone and just rode it, never changing anything but tires and fuel. He concentrated not on jetting or gearing or which tire works where, but just on going as humanly fast as he could go on that motorcycle. He learned that going six inches wide on the exit of this corner gave him another mile and a half on that straight; that it was pretty easy to pass other riders on the brakes; little lessons like that made him a better rider.

Of course, the fact that Bayliss and friends had no idea what they were doing helped.

Bayliss recalls, "I didn't have any car, so we used to take the back seat out of my father-in-law's van, put the bike in there and take it to the races. Me and (father-in-law) Max, we knew nothing about racing. All we did was put petrol in my bike and race."

Ignorance is bliss. "We'd be sitting in the pits, and look at all these riders working on their bikes, we'd look at each other and say, 'What are they doin'? Why are they workin' on their bikes all the time?'. It was quite funny."

Bayliss passed all the tests that fast club racers usually fail. He jumped up to the regional level, with more power and stiffer competition and still won. He started doing national level Supersport racing in Australia and went right to the front. That was a characteristic of his riding, that more times than not, really no matter what, he was at the front. Sometimes he won, sometimes he crashed and sometimes he finished back, but he was at the front time and again. A rider with that quality is hard to ignore even if he is too old to get a factory ride.

Then a man named Mat Mladin, who was riding for Kawasaki Australia, crashed an Ultralight airplane and cleaved his ankle and would sit out several races. Kawasaki needed a replacement rider and Bayliss, who not only has a good on-track record but a can-do attitude off, was chosen.

Though painful, Bayliss recalls what transpired, "I was racing 600 Supersport. Mat has an ultralight airplane, and he crashed and broke his leg. So I had a chance to race the Team Kawasaki bike. I qualified on the pole on my first time on the bike; I was dicing for the lead with one lap to go. I thought, 'I'm gonna win,' and that was it. I passed on the inside and hit the guy, fell off, and broke my wrist."

read the full story here

http://superbikeplanet.com/bayliss_2000_a.htm
The complete article is a good read even if Bayliss is pretty much the exception to the rule.
A good find
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Old 04-26-2008, 04:14 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by houseofpain View Post
, sounds kinda like the beginning of my story.....been painting for a while.....lost my license for almost 2 years ....just started club racing last year.....

but i think that's almost the end of my racing career story

maybe a good thing
Bayliss ruptured his sacks at Donninton last year I think it was,
now you wouldn't want that
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Old 04-26-2008, 07:46 AM   #5
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Bayliss and Biaggi - both very late starters to racing... n both darn good @ it :P!
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