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Old 04-10-2008, 04:56 PM   #41
Challen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheldonhull View Post
Si Si!

A mistake on a 250 helps teach you, rather than cause you to launch into the back of an Suv.

However, if you are just wanting to be a poser, get a 600cc, don't worry about what others say and show up to friends looking good. Never worry that you have terrible riding skills. I know i've got a ton to learn, very new. But i guarantee you i can already outride/be a much safer rider in heavy traffic than most of my friends that ride only on occasional weekends and bought 1000cc bikes as their first sport bike. I know how to flow, and yes i do some stupid stuff sometimes, but i try to learn to curb that aggressive side a bit on the street. The mistakes could be more than i bargain for.

NOT TO SAY some of you aren't good riders that started on 600cc, or 1000cc. You can become a good rider i'm sure having bought a 1000cc, etc, but its not the wisest and best choice to learning to ride. Its not an insult directed at you, just don't insult someone who is prudent enough to take riding seriously enough and with enough maturity to start small. YOU CAN NEVER START TO SMALL.

huyzel not insulting you if you started out like that... Just don't push a 600cc on a newer rider when a majority of experinced riders (very experinced) and those who started like me on a 250 will attest to it being a great way to start a high risk activity.

He's doing the right thing. Now you guys quit wasting your time on this forum and go riding! Don't be hating!

(yeah, i'm riding home in the rain, born to be wild theme playing of course in my head)
+1.....VERY wise words.

I've been teaching people to ride for almost 6 years now. The last 4 years full-time (60-65 classes a year).

To a tee, the best riders I've ever seen or ridden with are the ones that:
A) started on smaller bikes
B) continued their education (books, practice, ERC, track days)

I've lost count of the number that I've seen that have started on 600cc bikes, wanted to move up in 3 months (because they've "outridden" the bike), but still have 2" chicken strips on their tires.

My .02............He's making an AWESOME choice.
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Old 04-10-2008, 05:16 PM   #42
huyzel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheldonhull View Post
Si Si!

A mistake on a 250 helps teach you, rather than cause you to launch into the back of an Suv.

However, if you are just wanting to be a poser, get a 600cc, don't worry about what others say and show up to friends looking good. Never worry that you have terrible riding skills. I know i've got a ton to learn, very new. But i guarantee you i can already outride/be a much safer rider in heavy traffic than most of my friends that ride only on occasional weekends and bought 1000cc bikes as their first sport bike. I know how to flow, and yes i do some stupid stuff sometimes, but i try to learn to curb that aggressive side a bit on the street. The mistakes could be more than i bargain for.

NOT TO SAY some of you aren't good riders that started on 600cc, or 1000cc. You can become a good rider i'm sure having bought a 1000cc, etc, but its not the wisest and best choice to learning to ride. Its not an insult directed at you, just don't insult someone who is prudent enough to take riding seriously enough and with enough maturity to start small. YOU CAN NEVER START TO SMALL.

huyzel not insulting you if you started out like that... Just don't push a 600cc on a newer rider when a majority of experinced riders (very experinced) and those who started like me on a 250 will attest to it being a great way to start a high risk activity.

He's doing the right thing. Now you guys quit wasting your time on this forum and go riding! Don't be hating!

(yeah, i'm riding home in the rain, born to be wild theme playing of course in my head)
No your not insulting anyone.. I figured some people learn faster than others thus getting a bike with a bigger motor wouldnt be a problem. I never put this guy down by saying hes going to be a *** if he got a 250.. If he feels more comfortable on a 250 then thats fine.. but you can get a 600cc bike that is not a crotch rocket. There are great bikes out there that are made for long distance riding that has good power without the crazy throttle response. This is my two cents on this topic and if he chooses to take my opinion in consideration then cool.. but if he really wants a 250 then good for him.. better to have a bike than no bike.
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Old 04-10-2008, 05:41 PM   #43
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I bought a 250 as my first bike a month ago.

I've already (See sig) ridden that many miles on it.

Do I wish it had a little more power or an extra gear sometimes, sure. But I know I'm not pushing it to the limits. Far from it.

I've been to 2 small group rides and the 250 held up pretty well with the group. Naturally the entire time it was going.

Waaaaaaaaaaaah! Waaaaaaaah! Waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaah!
(Awesome sound effects)

At first the other riders were looking at me like... erm, shift up a few gears.
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Old 04-10-2008, 06:13 PM   #44
NorthHoustonGSXR
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Old 04-10-2008, 06:22 PM   #45
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Old 04-10-2008, 10:01 PM   #46
coojo
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man, people ditch their poor 250s too fast... so sad...
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Old 04-11-2008, 08:55 AM   #47
specterunseen
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Cool

Quote:
Originally Posted by Waerloga View Post
I bought a 250 as my first bike a month ago.

I've already (See sig) ridden that many miles on it.

Do I wish it had a little more power or an extra gear sometimes, sure. But I know I'm not pushing it to the limits. Far from it.

I've been to 2 small group rides and the 250 held up pretty well with the group. Naturally the entire time it was going.

Waaaaaaaaaaaah! Waaaaaaaah! Waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaah!
(Awesome sound effects)

At first the other riders were looking at me like... erm, shift up a few gears.


ROTFL.... That's us! No one likes to ride close behind us, sounds like the Moto GP to keep up with traffic at a traffic light... snicker....
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Old 04-11-2008, 08:57 AM   #48
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Smile

Repost for the benefit of 250ites:

Courtesy of Ninja250 forum: ABOUT RIDING ON THE NINJA 250 for a long distance trip:

You are very brave to attempt 150 miles non-stop on a toy bike. For such adventuring, here are some of the secrets of the 250 Riders Club vets. Well, at least the ones with the nerve to attempt what you're about to.

- switch to reserve at the start, before you get on the highway. This avoids fumbling around in what might be high-speed, heavy traffic.

- some drivers might disrespect such a small bike. One easy way to show them your confidence is by riding with your left hand in your jacket pocket, just like the cruiser riders do.

- ride the whole distance tucked in behind the windshield. Your teensy motor will need all the help it can get, especially uphill.

- keep both knees wide out, to increase side-to-side inertia. Due to the skinny tires, the bike is unstable at high speeds.

- don't wear earplugs. With that much strain on the bike something could go wrong, and you'll want to be able to hear it at the earliest possible moment.

- if you see a truck coming the other way, pull over onto the shoulder and slow down to a minimize wind blast that could send your lightweight bike snakey under you. When I see two or more trucks coming, I try to stop.

- don't make the trip if it's raining. There isn't enough bike weight to keep the tires in firm contact with the roadway, so it's way too easy to hydroplane. Add a crosswind to the rain and a Ninja rider is soon in real trouble.

- don't bring anything with you. The suspension won't cope with it when the high-speed airstream over the windshield forces the bike down, and the extra weight will kill the acceleration if you have to pass someone.

- always keep a tiny bit of pressure on the rear brake. This keeps your rear brake light lit, so cagers coming up behind will notice you sooner and not nearly run you down when they come up fast. Bigger bikes with wider rear tires have almost double the visible area from the rear, and don't need to do this.

- if you have to urinate, pull into a side road so you can do it on the engine. That's better than having the cylinders sieze up from overheating, which they will do if you're over 120 lbs. wearing your gear.

ALSO:

Until the engine warms, and most times after, it's prudent to do a bobsled start. That is, run next to the bike until you're above 5 mph. Then jump on and go. Failing to do this can easily burn up the clutch and waste the engine.

Also, lots of us coat ourselves in suntan oil, as this makes us slicker to the wind, thereby reducing the overall drag on the bike, and increasing out top speed to 57, even 58mph!

Some of us are more bold, and we've carried hooks and chains with us. We use these to briefly hitch a ride on the back of passing cars, when caught behind semis. These little bikes aren't good at passing without assistance.

Lastly, during any extended run, carry with you a spray bottle full of water. When it comes to the lil Ninja, this is the other facet of water cooling. As you travel, roughly every 3 tenths of a mile, mist a little water on the engine. While to the amateur this may seem like an indulgence, the more well traveled of us know it's truly the only thing standing between us and a flat bed ride back to our homes.

Cheers.
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Old 04-11-2008, 09:18 AM   #49
Ulric
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Quote:
Originally Posted by huyzel View Post
yes he did ask which one we would choose and my opinion is none of them.. I stated get a 600cc bike or just something with more power.. the ninja 500cc bikes are nice too.. not too much where you cant handle the power. Under track conditions its different.. your out there to learn the track and then ways to put the power down. This is a forum where people and post their thoughts. This is how i feel and that is all.. if this guy wants a 250 that bad then sure. but he is keeping it long term and i think its ok to go with something bigger.. just be more careful and take it slow. It doesnt matter if you are starting on a 250cc or a bicycle.. you can kill yourself either way... I dont see you telling him which one to get 07slvrcbr.. so you dont post.
He can turn around and re-sell the 250 for near what he bought it as long as it doesn't get trashed.


Out of your list, I'd go for #2.. good price, and newer model. With the damage/price #3 doesn't really seem worth the $ difference for the difference of a year in age.
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