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Old 09-14-2007, 03:32 AM   #1
NisAznMonk
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recommended tools?

What tools would someone generally own if they wanted to do basic maintenance? I'm mechanically inclined, but I'm not into tinkering. Basic things I'd like to do myself, but I'll leave the more complex stuff up to professionals. You can leave out the usual screwdrivers, wrenches, etc. I'm looking more at recommendations for motorcycle specific tools.
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Old 09-14-2007, 07:57 AM   #2
[poser]
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a good set of metric sockets and you should be set
get the alan sockets too, those are very useful
my ratchet wrenches have gotten really helped out too

as far as tool brands go, I'm a firm believer in, you get what you pay for
most of my hand tools [sockets, wrenches, screw drivers, etc...] are nicer brand: Craftsman, Cornwell, Snap-on.
I've got soem cheap tools too, and there is a difference.
some of my pnumatic tools I got the harbor frieght cheep ones, and they have actually turned out to be really good. I paid $10 for a cut off wheel and have abused it and it still runs strong. though for my impact I went with Mac
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Old 09-14-2007, 08:01 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by [poser] View Post
a good set of metric sockets and you should be set
get the alan sockets too, those are very useful
my ratchet wrenches have gotten really helped out too

as far as tool brands go, I'm a firm believer in, you get what you pay for
most of my hand tools [sockets, wrenches, screw drivers, etc...] are nicer brand: Craftsman, Cornwell, Snap-on.
I've got soem cheap tools too, and there is a difference.
some of my pnumatic tools I got the harbor frieght cheep ones, and they have actually turned out to be really good. I paid $10 for a cut off wheel and have abused it and it still runs strong. though for my impact I went with Mac

+1 I love my ratchet wrenches
.. for allen heads, I have a multi-socket tool looks like a swiss army knife...but has all the sizes youll need
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Old 09-14-2007, 08:03 AM   #4
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It's also helpful to have a set of allen wrenches in additon to the allen head sockets. I know I have a couple spots on my bike where the allen socket & ratchet cannot get into the tight space and I have to use to old fashioned small "L" shaped allen wrenches.

Also, a "tool" I could not live w/o is my 18" piece of iron pipe that I use for a breaker bar. I use it every time I take off my rear wheel. I'm too cheap to buy a huge socket for my rear axle, so I use the one that came in the bike's tool kit, but it has about a 4" handle so I use the breaker bar to make it usable.
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Old 09-14-2007, 09:44 AM   #5
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You know all about the hand tools.
Next you will need to get the spools and a rear stand to clean/lube the chain.
There is a hand vaccum pump that can help in changing the brake fluid without getting it everywhere and it can also help bleed the breaks after a pad change.
If you have problems with chain and sprocket wear in the future, you will need a breaker and a flare tool for the pins, that is pretty simple to do.
You need a DVOM (digital volt ohlm meeter) incase you run into any electrical problems and a shop manual will help with that.
And air compressor wil help with any semi-major maintenace that you take on and will help you check your tires before you leave on a ride. You can pick up a good one at Home Depot for under $300.
Lastly, you need a tricle charger to keep your battery up if you don't ride for a while. You can also pick up a cheap electrical booster box that plugs into the wall to jump if you don't go with a charger.

Motorcycles Unlimited can help with most of these items and I am waiting now to get into one of their maintenace classes. I paid them to clean my chain and show me how and they were happy to oblige.
I have built several drag cars in the past as a hobby and am getting into bikes now so most of these items I already have in either Snapon or Mac.

Hope this helps....
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Old 09-14-2007, 09:48 AM   #6
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T-Handles are awesome!
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Old 09-14-2007, 09:49 AM   #7
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Old 09-14-2007, 11:14 AM   #8
NisAznMonk
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dhdrider View Post
Also, a "tool" I could not live w/o is my 18" piece of iron pipe that I use for a breaker bar.
I think every shade tree mechanic should have one of those.
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Old 09-14-2007, 11:26 AM   #9
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Torque wrenches. Dial/clicker types for the <80 ft-lb and in the in-lb variety (~$70 each). Cheaper, guage type for above 80 ft-lb like rear axle (<$40).
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Old 09-14-2007, 11:28 AM   #10
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Oh, and most important of all...

Factory service manual

or

Haynes manual

or

Motorcycles Unlimited on your speed dial.
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Old 09-14-2007, 11:43 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Angamico View Post
Oh, and most important of all...

Factory service manual

or

Haynes manual

or

Motorcycles Unlimited on your speed dial.
best tool there is
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