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Old 09-04-2007, 04:31 PM   #1
Pre-K
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New pad break-in?

Are you supposed to break-in new brake pads? Any tips?
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Old 09-04-2007, 04:32 PM   #2
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good question i would like to know
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Old 09-04-2007, 04:39 PM   #3
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I never have.... but who knows... Patrick probably does.
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Old 09-04-2007, 04:46 PM   #4
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I'm thinking its not so much the pad as it is the rotor. You want to remove the (what am I trying to think of here) the glaze on the rotor. I think that is more of an issue if you are changing compounds though. I'd like to see some other replys though...
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Old 09-04-2007, 04:46 PM   #5
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With most of the newer pads, you are usually ready to go after a few hard applications on pit out. Just never come to a complete stop on new brand pads. After a few turns that should be it. Be sure to clean you rotors with a scothcbite pad and cleaner before you change. Just switched form Vesrah's back to EBC's last week. EBC's initial bite is a LOT harder than the Vesrah's and consistent all around. Thanks Patrick!
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Old 09-04-2007, 04:56 PM   #6
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BRAKE PAD BEDDING IN PROCEDURE

To ensure maximum performance and customer satisfaction, new brake pads must be bedded in upon installation. Correct bedding guarantees that new brake pads and new rotors work flawlessly together. In order to function optimally, organic brake pads must develop friction coal on its surface. This friction coal develops at a temperature of approximately 280°C (537°F). It is very important that this temperature is reached continuously and slowly. This gradual process generates temperatures that not only penetrate the surface of the brake discs and pads, but also distribute evenly through the whole disc and pad material. This is essential when using new brake discs, since the disc often shows signs of stress (due to the casting process and fast cooling) in the materials. A steady and careful warming and cooling process guarantees a good release of both materials.

The bedding in/break in procedure should be done as follows:

* Drive at approx. 35 mph (60 kmh) for about 500 yards (solid front discs) to 800 yards (vented front discs) while slightly dragging the brakes (i.e. light brake pedal pressure). This process allows the brake temperature to slowly and evenly build up to 300°C (572°F).
* Now, if possible, drive about 2200 yards maintaining the same speed without braking. This will allow the pads and discs to cool down evenly. After this cool-down, perform a normal brake application from 35 mph to 0. No panic stops!
* Now, the friction surface has evenly developed friction coal, the pads have bonded with the disc surface, and tensions in the disc materials will have disappeared.
* Only trained master mechanics should perform this procedure before delivering the vehicle to its owner. Do not expect your customer to properly finish your brake job!
* This bedding process is only suitable for the front axle - not the rear. This is due to the brake force distribution of front and rear axles. In order to reach 300°C (527°F) on the rear pads you would have to drive several miles with dragging brakes. However, in that time the front brakes will be glowing red, overheating and thus destroying the front brakes.
* Final note – don’t forget to clean hubs and check the wheel bearings. Also, the brake fluid should be replaced at least every 2 years.
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Old 09-04-2007, 04:58 PM   #7
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Pad and Rotor Bed-In Theory, Definitions and Procedures

StopTech's Recommended Procedure for Bedding-in Performance Brake Systems

by Matt Weiss of StopTech and James Walker, Jr. of scR motorsports

* *

When a system has both new rotors and pads, there are two different objectives for bedding-in a performance brake system: heating up the brake rotors and pads in a prescribed manner, so as to transfer pad material evenly onto the rotors; and maturing the pad material, so that resins which are used to bind and form it are ‘cooked' out of the pad.

The first objective is achieved by performing a series of stops, so that the brake rotor and pad material are heated steadily to a temperature that promotes the transfer of pad material onto the brake rotor friction surface. There is one pitfall in this process, however, which must be avoided. The rotor and, therefore, the vehicle should not be brought to a complete stop, with the brakes still applied, as this risks the non-uniform transfer of pad material onto the friction surface.

The second objective of the bedding-in process is achieved by performing another set of stops, in order to mature the pad itself. This ensures that resins which are used to bind and form the pad material are ‘cooked' out of the pad, at the point where the pad meets the rotor's friction surface.

The bed-in process is not complete until both sets of stops have been performed. There's one exception, however. Some pad manufacturers sell ‘race-ready' pads, which have been pre-conditioned by flame heat-treating or laser etching, to provide a mature surface on the pad face. If race-ready pads are being used, then the second set of controlled stops is unnecessary. Also note that the same circumstances exist when a system to be bedded has new rotors and used pads (a strategy that professional teams use to break in their rotors ahead of time) one only has to perform a single set of stops to transfer pad material uniformly onto the new rotor.

Note that, if the brakes of a vehicle with high-performance or racing pads are not used continuously in an aggressive manner, the transfer layer on the rotors can be abraded (literally worn off). However, the transfer layer can be re-established, if needed, by repeating one series of stops in the bed-in procedure. This process may be repeated as often as necessary during the life of the pad.

This characteristic is useful when a system is already bedded-in with one pad friction and another is to be used going forward, like when changing between pad types for the street and track (and then after a track event, back again). The procedure under this case is different, where the new friction is installed and the vehicle is first driven for 5 to 20 miles (8 to 33 Km) with light use, keeping the pad friction and rotor cold. This promotes the abrasive friction mechanism cleaning the rotor surface of the previous pad material before performing either one or two bed-in cycles as prescribed below. One set of stops as outlined, if the pads being installed are used, two if the pads are actually new

The bed-in procedures below outline the steps required to effectively bed-in performance brake systems. We strongly recommend that, in order to complete the bed-in safely, the bed-in procedures be conducted in dry conditions on a race track or other controlled environment, so as not to endanger yourself or others. Please note that we neither recommend nor condone driving at high speeds on public roads. While it is important to get enough heat into the system to effectively bed-in the brakes, it is even more important to exercise common sense at all times, and to conduct the bed-in procedure responsibly.
Bedding-in Street-Performance Pads

For a typical performance brake system using street-performance pads, a series of ten partial braking events, from 60mph down to 10mph, will typically raise the temperature of the brake components sufficiently to be considered one bed-in set. Each of the ten partial braking events should achieve moderate-to-high deceleration (about 80 to 90% of the deceleration required to lock up the brakes and/or to engage the ABS), and they should be made one after the other, without allowing the brakes to cool in between.

Depending on the make-up of the pad material, the brake friction will seem to gain slightly in performance, and will then lose or fade somewhat by around the fifth stop (also about the time that a friction smell will be detectable in the passenger compartment). This does not indicate that the brakes are bedded-in. This phenomenon is known as a green fade, as it is characteristic of immature or ‘green' pads, in which the resins still need to be driven out of the pad material, at the point where the pads meet the rotors. In this circumstance, the upper temperature limit of the friction material will not yet have been reached.

As when bedding-in any set of brakes, care should be taken regarding the longer stopping distance necessary with incompletely bedded pads. This first set of stops in the bed-in process is only complete when all ten stops have been performed - not before. The system should then be allowed to cool, by driving the vehicle at the highest safe speed for the circumstances, without bringing it to a complete stop with the brakes still applied. After cooling the vehicle, a second set of ten partial braking events should be performed, followed by another cooling exercise. In some situations, a third set is beneficial, but two are normally sufficient.
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Old 09-04-2007, 05:07 PM   #8
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This is what I do

For a typical performance brake system using street-performance pads, a series of ten partial braking events, from 60mph down to 10mph, will typically raise the temperature of the brake components sufficiently to be considered one bed-in set. Each of the ten partial braking events should achieve moderate-to-high deceleration (about 80 to 90% of the deceleration required to lock up the brakes and/or to engage the ABS), and they should be made one after the other, without allowing the brakes to cool in between.
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Old 09-04-2007, 06:54 PM   #9
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+1 for what Buck said.

We used to do a warm-up ride for a minute or two. Then do about 10 hard brakes, one after another from about 50mph to 5mph as hard as possible.

Anytime you get new pads, it's a good idea to clean your rotors so they don't glaze-over.
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Old 09-04-2007, 08:06 PM   #10
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Thanks, I definately would not have done it right w/out the help!

Hey Buck, got any spots open for Sat 9-15? (Yes I know I will e-mail you)
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Old 09-04-2007, 08:41 PM   #11
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todd, i changed brakes pads before cresson and just went into the first turn and grabbed a handful of brake the first few times and they felt good after that
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Old 09-04-2007, 09:21 PM   #12
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todd, i changed brakes pads before cresson and just went into the first turn and grabbed a handful of brake the first few times and they felt good after that
Sounds easier than 10 full paragraphs of break-in procedure

Thanks to everyone!
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Old 09-05-2007, 02:12 PM   #13
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So I got the new pads on, but the wheels drag... I can only get it to spin about 3/4 to 1 full turn. Is this normal with new, un-broken-in pads?

The drag is constant, not like the rotors are warped or anything. Maybe I should just go ride the thing...

Just don't wanna screw it up...
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Old 09-05-2007, 02:19 PM   #14
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Whats wrong with my post, I thought that I was being helpfull. Dont be mad at me if you dont want to read it ......

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Sounds easier than 10 full paragraphs of break-in procedure

Thanks to everyone!
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Old 09-05-2007, 03:06 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pre-K View Post
So I got the new pads on, but the wheels drag... I can only get it to spin about 3/4 to 1 full turn. Is this normal with new, un-broken-in pads?

The drag is constant, not like the rotors are warped or anything. Maybe I should just go ride the thing...

Just don't wanna screw it up...
you could just take off the calipers and and pry apart the pads and then put them back on and give the lever a few pulls to get them where they need to be. mine do it every time after i change my tire and then its normal after i ride a session/race.
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Old 09-05-2007, 03:11 PM   #16
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Old 09-05-2007, 04:15 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Pre-K View Post
So I got the new pads on, but the wheels drag... I can only get it to spin about 3/4 to 1 full turn. Is this normal with new, un-broken-in pads?

The drag is constant, not like the rotors are warped or anything. Maybe I should just go ride the thing...

Just don't wanna screw it up...
You may have hydrauliced the master. Wrap it good with rags and remove the top, and see if it is overfilled.
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Old 09-05-2007, 10:39 PM   #18
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+1 to Nofear's "10 paragraphs" This is THE BEST way to bed in new pads and/or rotors. Read it. You'll be smarter for it. Go really easy at first after fitting new pads. They will not stop your bike at first until you pump the lever and bed them in properly. Just read the procedure and follow it precisely. You'll be glad you did when you stop in time to avoid that next turdburgler who cuts you off and slams on the brakes.
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