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Old 07-15-2016, 08:02 AM   #1
mrh
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Hot Weather and Training

During summer months in Houston heat often hits the high 90s. At that temperature, is not uncommon for asphalt or concrete training ranges to radiate heat in the 120-130 degrees range. Add in 70-90% humidity and even a native Houstonian can get heat sickness.

Even if you've lived in south TX your whole life, if you're like most folks you get up each morning in your air-conditioned house, drive to work in your air-conditioned car, do your job in climate-controlled conditions, drive home again in your car with the AC blasting and spend your evening in your cool air-conditioned house. That's just normal life in Houston.

So most folks aren't prepared to spend hours in the sun while wearing gear, sitting on motorcycles and enduring stressful and challenging activities. Instructors are trained to watch for signs of heat stress and will usually stop someone who appears to be suffering from the effects of heat. But for a student who suddenly feels the onset of heat sickness, that's small comfort.

Do yourself a favor. If you've scheduled a motorcycle class during the hot months, follow these simple steps to GREATLY reduce your chances of heat stress, heat sickness or (worst of all) heat stroke:

• Be sure to wear a light-weight, light-colored long sleeved shirt. If you're wearing a jacket to ride, take it off between exercises and during breaks.
• Drink a TON of water before going to bed the night before your class, and drink at least 24 ounces of water when you wake up the morning of the class.
• Continue to drink a LOT of water through the day.
• Bring a hat. When not riding take off your helmet and put on the hat for shade.
• Eat light in the mornings and at lunch. Salty, fatty foods are more likely to make you sick in the heat. Avoid coffee, Gator Ade and caffeinated beverages before and during your class.
• Use sunscreen on every area of exposed skin.
• Get a good solid eight hours of sleep each night so you’re not tired when you arrive.
• When opportunities arise to sit and rest, do so.

Enjoy your class, and have a great summer!
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Old 07-15-2016, 09:41 AM   #2
mrh
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When it's Hot

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrh View Post
During summer months in Houston heat often hits the high 90s. At that temperature, is not uncommon for asphalt or concrete training ranges to radiate heat in the 120-130 degrees range. Add in 70-90% humidity and even a native Houstonian can get heat sickness.

Even if you've lived in south TX your whole life, if you're like most folks you get up each morning in your air-conditioned house, drive to work in your air-conditioned car, do your job in climate-controlled conditions, drive home again in your car with the AC blasting and spend your evening in your cool air-conditioned house. That's just normal life in Houston.

So most folks aren't prepared to spend hours in the sun while wearing gear, sitting on motorcycles and enduring stressful and challenging activities. Instructors are trained to watch for signs of heat stress and will usually stop someone who appears to be suffering from the effects of heat. But for a student who suddenly feels the onset of heat sickness, that's small comfort.

Do yourself a favor. If you've scheduled a motorcycle class during the hot months, follow these simple steps to GREATLY reduce your chances of heat stress, heat sickness or (worst of all) heat stroke:

• Be sure to wear a light-weight, light-colored long sleeved shirt. If you're wearing a jacket to ride, take it off between exercises and during breaks.
• Drink a TON of water before going to bed the night before your class, and drink at least 24 ounces of water when you wake up the morning of the class.
• Continue to drink a LOT of water through the day.
• Bring a hat. When not riding take off your helmet and put on the hat for shade.
• Eat light in the mornings and at lunch. Salty, fatty foods are more likely to make you sick in the heat. Avoid coffee, Gator Ade and caffeinated beverages before and during your class.
• Use sunscreen on every area of exposed skin.
• Get a good solid eight hours of sleep each night so you’re not tired when you arrive.
• When opportunities arise to sit and rest, do so.

Enjoy your class, and have a great summer!
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Old 07-15-2016, 10:07 AM   #3
Schooley
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Rule of thumb I was taught during some stupid hard training in Fort Benning, GA:

If you cant make yourself pee every 15-25 minutes you can be more hydrated.
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Old 07-15-2016, 10:23 AM   #4
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When we go to the (mx) track, we integrate a Gatorade after every two waters, to help re-establish minerals & electolytes....
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Old 07-15-2016, 10:34 AM   #5
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Went to the mx track last week and drank 3 gallons of water in 4 hours. Didnt pee once all day. Its amazing how much water you need to stay hydrated in this heat.
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Old 07-15-2016, 11:06 AM   #6
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Be careful with GatorAde on very hot days. That stuff contains a huge amount of salt and sugar, and it will make you very sick very fast if you're dehydrated and overheated. ("Technicolor reversals" are not uncommon under those circumstances!)
If you choose to drink sports drinks, mix them 50-50 with tepid water. Your body will absorb the liquid faster and there is less chance of unexpected issues.
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Old 07-15-2016, 11:23 AM   #7
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Coconut Water naturally supports hydration with 5 electrolytes, including as much potassium as a banana...
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Old 07-15-2016, 02:08 PM   #8
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Quote:
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Coconut Water naturally supports hydration with 5 electrolytes, including as much potassium as a banana...
Coconut WATER. Different from Coconut milk. Wanted to clarify for those that are not familiar.

Still will need plenty of regular water in between.

Thanks for the post, mrh.
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Last edited by W.O.T.; 07-15-2016 at 02:12 PM.
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Old 07-15-2016, 03:38 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrh View Post
During summer months in Houston heat often hits the high 90s. At that temperature, is not uncommon for asphalt or concrete training ranges to radiate heat in the 120-130 degrees range. Add in 70-90% humidity and even a native Houstonian can get heat sickness.

Even if you've lived in south TX your whole life, if you're like most folks you get up each morning in your air-conditioned house, drive to work in your air-conditioned car, do your job in climate-controlled conditions, drive home again in your car with the AC blasting and spend your evening in your cool air-conditioned house. That's just normal life in Houston.

So most folks aren't prepared to spend hours in the sun while wearing gear, sitting on motorcycles and enduring stressful and challenging activities. Instructors are trained to watch for signs of heat stress and will usually stop someone who appears to be suffering from the effects of heat. But for a student who suddenly feels the onset of heat sickness, that's small comfort.

Do yourself a favor. If you've scheduled a motorcycle class during the hot months, follow these simple steps to GREATLY reduce your chances of heat stress, heat sickness or (worst of all) heat stroke:

• Be sure to wear a light-weight, light-colored long sleeved shirt. If you're wearing a jacket to ride, take it off between exercises and during breaks.
• Drink a TON of water before going to bed the night before your class, and drink at least 24 ounces of water when you wake up the morning of the class.
• Continue to drink a LOT of water through the day.
• Bring a hat. When not riding take off your helmet and put on the hat for shade.
• Eat light in the mornings and at lunch. Salty, fatty foods are more likely to make you sick in the heat. Avoid coffee, Gator Ade and caffeinated beverages before and during your class.
• Use sunscreen on every area of exposed skin.
• Get a good solid eight hours of sleep each night so you’re not tired when you arrive.
• When opportunities arise to sit and rest, do so.

Enjoy your class, and have a great summer!

lesson learned!
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Old 07-15-2016, 05:58 PM   #10
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Yeah it's crazy riding in the Texas heat. I've found that drinking 1oz water per lb of weight of rider in helps before/during/after.

covering up completely however you do it is a must. Long sleeve button up-jacket,gloves,pants,boots. Last ride I rode with short gloves and a 1/2inch gap around my wrist that was exposed got sun burn a lil. Ride in the early a.m, or evening if you can choose to.
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