MotoHouston.com MotoHouston.com
Register Members List Member Map Media Calendar Garage Forum Home Mark Forums Read

Go Back   MotoHouston.com > Technical > How To's and Q & A's
Forgot info?

Welcome to MotoHouston.com! You are currently viewing our forums as a guest which gives you limited access to the community. By joining our free community you will have access to great discounts from our sponsors, the ability to post topics, communicate privately with other members, respond to polls, upload content, free email, classifieds, and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free, join our community!

Register Today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.


Like us on Facebook! Regular shirt GIVEAWAYS and more

Advertisement

Reply
Share This Thread: 
Subscribe to this Thread Thread Tools
Old 03-15-2015, 07:19 PM   #21
Rgprestige15
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 181

Experience: 3 years
Trackdays: 10+

Bike(s):
gen 2 zx10r street
05 600rr track








Quote:
Originally Posted by bumblebee View Post
It's not that unusual for there to be a little discrepancy in the marks. Unless the cam sprockets are adjustable you could never get better alignment than that.
Don't worry about it.
Thanks!
Rgprestige15 is offline   Reply With Quote
Similar Topics
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Valve Inspection - Orings drummervato How To's and Q & A's 6 08-25-2014 09:41 AM
When is the best time to buy a new bike from the dealership? JudasViet General Discussion (Moto Related) 24 06-02-2013 01:31 AM
Time to buy another bike need help Gsxracer General Discussion (Moto Related) 8 06-03-2010 09:39 PM
Looking to buy a bike, but it has expired Registration and Inspection. rkl56119 General Discussion (Moto Related) 26 12-30-2009 12:00 AM
Best time to buy a bike... aboo007 General Discussion (Moto Related) 9 10-20-2008 02:35 PM
Advertisement
Old 03-15-2015, 08:59 PM   #22
gots2no
Steve
 
gots2no's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Pearland
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 936

Experience: 10+ years
Trackdays: 10+

Bike(s):
'94 Kawasaki ZX6
'78 Yamaha XS750E (sold)
'82 Yamaha Seca 750 (sold)
'82 Yamaha XT200 (sold)

Member Garage





If you decide to adjust, I've got a set of 6.48mm ID shims that you're welcome to pick from. That is, if you don't mind the Hot Cams shims that aren't as hard according to 40acres. I've adjusted my ZX6E and have had it upwards of 13k several times at the track.
gots2no is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2015, 08:45 AM   #23
Donte
Im The Dreaded One
 
Donte's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Tomball, Woodlands, Spring
Feedback Rating: (1)
Posts: 913

Experience: 1-3 months

Bike(s):
GS500F




Member Garage





Quote:
Originally Posted by dudewhrsmybike View Post
Apologies...Well I'll be damned, I've been reading liter bike service manuals too long. There is no mention of this, this must be a 600cc thing, possibly other models. Can't believe this is the first time I've seen that.
Aren't liter bikes are suppose to be able to go longer in between checks because they dont rev as high?

Ive done a lot of searching on the topic for the inline 4's. Because the newer bikes have the "under bucket" design they shouldn't go out of spec as quickly as the "screw" type valves on the older bikes. Ive read some say that the first check/adjustment should be as early as 600 miles from new to make sure they're being seated properly. I've also read that one Suzuki dealer service center started recommending to check around 25-26k miles because they have never seen a bike out of spec before than. Ive read some stating they have gone anywhere from 50-70k with out the valves ever being out of spec and some of those being "race bikes".

For the OP and really everyone:
You only have two choices, you either go by the book and make sure. Or you risk it and save some money. Its a balance of trying to save money and down time vs the longevity/reliability of your engine.

A lot of SS bike never really need a check because they get wrecked before they even make it to 15k.
__________________
Donte is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2015, 11:40 AM   #24
Rgprestige15
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 181

Experience: 3 years
Trackdays: 10+

Bike(s):
gen 2 zx10r street
05 600rr track








My 10r and 600rr call for a check at 15k and 16k respectively. I'm probably going to check the track bike at the end of each season depending. While it's down for the winter, I would say its an hour or two well spent (just checking is a piece of cake).

My 10r (street) was checked at ~15k miles - all valves in spec and no cracked retainers (b/c thats a thing on zx10rs )

My 600rr (track from day one) was checked at ~4,4xx miles - 4 valves were barely tight.
Rgprestige15 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2015, 11:52 AM   #25
Blanco
BORC O.G.
 
Blanco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Cypress
Feedback Rating: (5)
Posts: 3,075

Experience: 10+ years
Trackdays: 1

Bike(s):
2013 ZX10R & 09 ZX-14
'09 R1 (homeboy shopping network donation)
'07 ZX14 (sold)
'01 FZ1 (sold)
ZRX1100 (sold)






Quote:
Originally Posted by Donte View Post
Aren't liter bikes are suppose to be able to go longer in between checks because they dont rev as high?

Ive done a lot of searching on the topic for the inline 4's. Because the newer bikes have the "under bucket" design they shouldn't go out of spec as quickly as the "screw" type valves on the older bikes. Ive read some say that the first check/adjustment should be as early as 600 miles from new to make sure they're being seated properly. I've also read that one Suzuki dealer service center started recommending to check around 25-26k miles because they have never seen a bike out of spec before than. Ive read some stating they have gone anywhere from 50-70k with out the valves ever being out of spec and some of those being "race bikes".

For the OP and really everyone:
You only have two choices, you either go by the book and make sure. Or you risk it and save some money. Its a balance of trying to save money and down time vs the longevity/reliability of your engine.

A lot of SS bike never really need a check because they get wrecked before they even make it to 15k.
Donte, I know what people say on the ZX6 forum but at 15K, it would be a miracle to not have something out of spec in the valves. Go get your stuff inspected!
__________________
Consigliere
Blanco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2015, 12:28 PM   #26
wiayeman
TOONTOON BLACKNWHITEARMY
 
wiayeman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Med Ctr
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 1,122

Experience: 10+ years
Trackdays: 10+

Bike(s):
99 SV650 (race)x2
79 XS650
08 EX250R (race)
14 MSX125
88 YSR (race)






SV's never need anything. Ever.
__________________
OOT
CMRA#645
Purple Helmets Endurance Team
wiayeman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2015, 12:31 PM   #27
Flip Flop
Ordained Minister
 
Flip Flop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Cypress
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 10,518

Experience: 1 year

Bike(s):
2006 SV650S(sold)(happy now?)
Toes Ducati Multistrada(what now buck?)








Shell rotella T and some duct tape
Flip Flop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2015, 12:32 PM   #28
bumblebee
Yeah I'm flippin' YOU off
 
bumblebee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Pearland
Feedback Rating: (3)
Posts: 12,264


Bike(s):
'74 Suzuki GT380
'82 XS650 StreetTracker
'10 Ducati Streetfighter
'83 Yamaha Seca 900






I have no sympathy for the cost to get valves adjusted on Japanese bikes.
I have a Ducati, lol, and it's almost due

There's goes several $100. Don't even really have the option to adjust them myself. The special tools are expensive too.
__________________
Asphalt is for racing... dirt is for growing potatoes. - J. Diester
When seconds count... the police are only minutes away.
Grow up and be a productive member of society already.
Bevo- "I lack skillz"
bumblebee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2015, 12:34 PM   #29
Flip Flop
Ordained Minister
 
Flip Flop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Cypress
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 10,518

Experience: 1 year

Bike(s):
2006 SV650S(sold)(happy now?)
Toes Ducati Multistrada(what now buck?)








Grab you a cup of expresso in the waiting room and pretend you're some uppity rich european
Flip Flop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2015, 01:14 PM   #30
gots2no
Steve
 
gots2no's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Pearland
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 936

Experience: 10+ years
Trackdays: 10+

Bike(s):
'94 Kawasaki ZX6
'78 Yamaha XS750E (sold)
'82 Yamaha Seca 750 (sold)
'82 Yamaha XT200 (sold)

Member Garage





Here is some data from my 600 inline 4 ZX6E.
10/2011 @ 25,000 miles adjusted clearance (maybe first time as not original owner) All clearances were too tight, but all had some, almost zero, but some clearance.
01/2014 @ 37,000 miles checked clearance - in 12,000 miles, the intake clearances increased on average 0.05mm while the exhaust had no measurable change. I'm going to check them again at around 47,000 miles. At 40K right now.

I have a nice Excel spreadsheet to calculate the needed shim sizes and it even graphs the clearances against the specs (my bike's specs that is) if anyone wants a copy
gots2no is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2015, 03:55 PM   #31
bumblebee
Yeah I'm flippin' YOU off
 
bumblebee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Pearland
Feedback Rating: (3)
Posts: 12,264


Bike(s):
'74 Suzuki GT380
'82 XS650 StreetTracker
'10 Ducati Streetfighter
'83 Yamaha Seca 900






Quote:
Originally Posted by Shelnutt View Post
Grab you a cup of expresso in the waiting room and pretend you're some uppity rich european
I'll try to work on my Eye-talian accent and my snobbish demeanor.

Do the Europeans still lift their little finger when they sip espresso?
Do I have to stop showering several days in advance?
Pointy shoes?
Skinny pants?

There's so much to learn...
__________________
Asphalt is for racing... dirt is for growing potatoes. - J. Diester
When seconds count... the police are only minutes away.
Grow up and be a productive member of society already.
Bevo- "I lack skillz"
bumblebee is offline   Reply With Quote
Liked this post:
Old 03-16-2015, 06:36 PM   #32
dontbap()ssy
Senior Member
 
dontbap()ssy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Kingwood
Feedback Rating: (2)
Posts: 591

Experience: 10+ years
Trackdays: 10+

Bike(s):
04 R6 (sold)
04 R1 (donated to the track gods)
08 MV Agusta F4 312R (sold)
10 duc 1198






Quote:
Originally Posted by bumblebee View Post
I have no sympathy for the cost to get valves adjusted on Japanese bikes.
I have a Ducati, lol, and it's almost due

There's goes several $100. Don't even really have the option to adjust them myself. The special tools are expensive too.
I did the valves on my 1198 and rented everything from here
http://www.ducatitoolrental.com/

They only charge you for the shims you use, it is really a nice set up if you want to work on your bike
dontbap()ssy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2015, 07:05 PM   #33
bumblebee
Yeah I'm flippin' YOU off
 
bumblebee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Pearland
Feedback Rating: (3)
Posts: 12,264


Bike(s):
'74 Suzuki GT380
'82 XS650 StreetTracker
'10 Ducati Streetfighter
'83 Yamaha Seca 900






Quote:
Originally Posted by dontbap()ssy View Post
I did the valves on my 1198 and rented everything from here
http://www.ducatitoolrental.com/

They only charge you for the shims you use, it is really a nice set up if you want to work on your bike
Not sure I wanna tackle that. I'm only an aircraft mechanic and former yamaha shop service manager.
Seriously, my experience with working on the Ducati has been that fasteners are soft, easily stripped and if the engine is similar, I'd rather somebody else was liable, lol.
__________________
Asphalt is for racing... dirt is for growing potatoes. - J. Diester
When seconds count... the police are only minutes away.
Grow up and be a productive member of society already.
Bevo- "I lack skillz"
bumblebee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2015, 07:09 PM   #34
dontbap()ssy
Senior Member
 
dontbap()ssy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Kingwood
Feedback Rating: (2)
Posts: 591

Experience: 10+ years
Trackdays: 10+

Bike(s):
04 R6 (sold)
04 R1 (donated to the track gods)
08 MV Agusta F4 312R (sold)
10 duc 1198






Quote:
Originally Posted by bumblebee View Post
Not sure I wanna tackle that. I'm only an aircraft mechanic and former yamaha shop service manager.
Seriously, my experience with working on the Ducati has been that fasteners are soft, easily stripped and if the engine is similar, I'd rather somebody else was liable, lol.
That's crazy, I was a AMP for American Airlines.

I didn't think it was a tough job just time consuming, triple checked every adjustment. I really enjoy working on everything I own, primarily because I'm curious how stuff works
dontbap()ssy is offline   Reply With Quote
Liked this post:
Old 03-16-2015, 07:30 PM   #35
bumblebee
Yeah I'm flippin' YOU off
 
bumblebee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Pearland
Feedback Rating: (3)
Posts: 12,264


Bike(s):
'74 Suzuki GT380
'82 XS650 StreetTracker
'10 Ducati Streetfighter
'83 Yamaha Seca 900






Quote:
Originally Posted by dontbap()ssy View Post
That's crazy, I was a AMP for American Airlines.

I didn't think it was a tough job just time consuming, triple checked every adjustment. I really enjoy working on everything I own, primarily because I'm curious how stuff works
Honestly, I think I could handle it but like I said, I'd rather somebody else was liable for any mistakes. Sounds like a pain in the that comes with the extra excitement of horrible engine damage, ha.
I like to work on my own stuff too, having old bikes requires that you don't mind getting your hands dirty but I think I'll share the fun with Patrick and his guys.
__________________
Asphalt is for racing... dirt is for growing potatoes. - J. Diester
When seconds count... the police are only minutes away.
Grow up and be a productive member of society already.
Bevo- "I lack skillz"
bumblebee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2015, 08:02 PM   #36
gots2no
Steve
 
gots2no's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Pearland
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 936

Experience: 10+ years
Trackdays: 10+

Bike(s):
'94 Kawasaki ZX6
'78 Yamaha XS750E (sold)
'82 Yamaha Seca 750 (sold)
'82 Yamaha XT200 (sold)

Member Garage





Quote:
Originally Posted by dontbap()ssy View Post

I didn't think it was a tough job just time consuming, triple checked every adjustment. I really enjoy working on everything I own, primarily because I'm curious how stuff works
I as well, hence my screen name
gots2no is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2015, 09:35 PM   #37
Donte
Im The Dreaded One
 
Donte's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Tomball, Woodlands, Spring
Feedback Rating: (1)
Posts: 913

Experience: 1-3 months

Bike(s):
GS500F




Member Garage





Quote:
Originally Posted by Blanco View Post
Donte, I know what people say on the ZX6 forum but at 15K, it would be a miracle to not have something out of spec in the valves. Go get your stuff inspected!
Im not ridding that bike until i get it adjusted now, but wont happen for at least another month.Ill let y'all know how bad my valves are then.

Did you see my other post on here stating that non US bikes can go to 26k. Im curious as to what your thoughts are on that?
__________________
Donte is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2015, 05:40 AM   #38
Flip Flop
Ordained Minister
 
Flip Flop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Cypress
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 10,518

Experience: 1 year

Bike(s):
2006 SV650S(sold)(happy now?)
Toes Ducati Multistrada(what now buck?)








And youre sure it says MILES not Km?
Flip Flop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2015, 07:13 AM   #39
Flip Flop
Ordained Minister
 
Flip Flop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Cypress
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 10,518

Experience: 1 year

Bike(s):
2006 SV650S(sold)(happy now?)
Toes Ducati Multistrada(what now buck?)








I got an idea riding into work today...

On the SV apparently the exhaust valves on the rear cylinder are by far the most likely to go out of spec(heat)

Sooo with that knowledge, I am only going to remove the rear valve cover and check those first. If those are bad, I'll take it to the shop without bothering on the front cylinder. If good I will move onto the front.
Flip Flop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2015, 10:25 AM   #40
dudewhrsmybike
Moderator
 
dudewhrsmybike's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Galleria
Feedback Rating: (3)
Posts: 12,665

Experience: 8 years
Trackdays: 10+

Bike(s):
2011 Kawasaki ZX-10R ABS




Member Garage





Send a message via AIM to dudewhrsmybike
I have done 3 shim under bucket valve adjustments on my ZX-10R's and the hardest part is tearing into the bike and putting it back together. Measuring clearance and re-shimming is the easy part. It is a time consuming job, but if you have the spare time, it's worth the knowledge learned and the few hundred $$$'s saved. Also, you have piece of mind knowing the valves were shimmed that needed it.

Because you have never done it, pulling the cams to re-shim will be an intimidating task, I completely understand that as I used to think the same regarding tearing into the bike and letting a shop reshim. If you've made it as far as checking the clearances, there's no reason you can't finish the job.

A trick I use because it's very hard for me to see the timing marks on my cam sprocket is to strike them with a white line on the chain and sprocket at TDC just before I remove the cams. This allows me to ensure I'm at TDC when I reinstall the cams. I still double check the timing marks but this just takes out some of the guess work when I'm trying to put the chain back on the sprockets and tighten down the cam caps.

When re-installing the cams, one of the tricks I've learned is to keep pressure on the cam chain with your finger. If you do not do this, the chain can easily skip a tooth without you knowing. This will cause your timing to be off and you will have to loosen the cam caps again to put the chain back on with correct timing. Another reason the white line is useful, it's an easy way to see that you haven't skipped a tooth on the sprocket.

I think it's already been said, but you absolutely need the service manual. Follow it to a T. There will be a bolt tightening sequence you need to follow when tightening the cam caps back down, and you will also need it for all your torque values.
__________________


It's GREEN, it's FAST, and it says Ninja on it
dudewhrsmybike is offline   Reply With Quote
Liked this post:
Reply


Thread Tools

Advertisement


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:02 AM.


MotoHouston.com is not responsible for the content posted by users.
Privacy Policy