Welcome back to us :/ Our hosts data center was down for the entire day.
MotoHouston.com MotoHouston.com
Register Members List Member Map Media Calendar Garage Forum Home Mark Forums Read

Go Back   MotoHouston.com > General Discussion > General Discussion (Moto Related)
Forgot info?

Welcome to MotoHouston.com! You are currently viewing our forums as a guest which gives you limited access to the community. By joining our free community you will have access to great discounts from our sponsors, the ability to post topics, communicate privately with other members, respond to polls, upload content, free email, classifieds, and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free, join our community!

Register Today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.


FREE MH Decals by MAIL!

Advertisement

Reply
Share This Thread: 
Subscribe to this Thread Thread Tools
Old 03-17-2014, 01:04 AM   #21
Bart
Thread killer
 
Bart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Katy
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 756

Experience: 2 years

Bike(s):
2005 R6
'06 Suzuki Katana 750 (destroyed)








The topic of "what process do I go through to get my first bike" and/or "what should I get for my 1st bike" is a thoroughly discussed topic. Here's a quick rundown of the advice you'll get:

1 - take the MSF course (which you're doing - kudos!)

2 - for budgeting, make the bike your LAST purchase. Shop for everything else first, then see how much $ you have left over.

* MSF / other training

* SAFETY GEAR: ~Helmet (#1!!) ~jacket ~gloves ~riding boots ~riding pants

* Insurance (any dealer will require proof of insurance before you can take a bike off the lot, by law, new or used bike)

* a couple tanks of gas

* maintenance fund (at least $200, preferably $1000 or more)


3 - get a bike in the best condition possible. You're going to learn many things about maintenance & repair soon (usually the hard way), including the fact that bike ownership will set you back a small fortune. If you're not already an expert bike mechanic, "right off the bat" is not the best time to learn.

4 - Pass up the pretty one. You're going to drop it, you're going to drop it, you're going to drop it. And, when your confidence level builds up (3-6 month range), you've got just a few months (maybe) before you're going to overestimate your skills and wreck it. I know, it's only a 95% chance and you think you're going to be the exception. We all did. I speak for many of us when I say that I made the mistake of getting "the one I always wanted" for my first, and Gawd do I miss that one. Hobbling on a lame leg while other people pull pieces of one's bike out of ditch... it's like feeling a bump at the end of your driveway and looking at pieces of your pet. So, get the old, slow and ugly one for your first.

5 - take your time. There's no shame in keeping to the parking lot for your first several rides. Then stick to quiet neighborhood streets with good roads and (hopefully) few kids and dogs. Most people find that the learning curve is larger than you expect; you've got hundreds of pounds of metal underneath you, power that can overpower you, and the laws of physics use reverse psychology.


And last... make friends. Online is a good place to start. Once you can handle the neighborhood, see if someone will ride with you. Group rides are usually safe, and having a riding buddy is both fun and really helps you learn.

Good luck!
__________________
The meaning of life is that life is meant to be lived
Bart is offline   Reply With Quote
Similar Topics
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
i need to buy an motor/complete for 96' 600 ASAP.cash ready an everything. please gsf600guy How To's and Q & A's 4 01-17-2015 11:30 AM
Bike not going past 4k rpms. WTF YoungGun General Discussion (Moto Related) 22 05-07-2012 11:56 PM
Want to buy a NEW 2009 R1 cash best price? ddgtomahawk General Discussion (Moto Related) 79 07-06-2009 11:09 PM
Advertisement
Old 03-17-2014, 07:26 AM   #22
Mustapha
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Houston, TX
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 31

Experience: 9-12 months

Bike(s):
2014 Kawasaki Ninja 300 ABS









Quote:
Originally Posted by Bart View Post
The topic of "what process do I go through to get my first bike" and/or "what should I get for my 1st bike" is a thoroughly discussed topic. Here's a quick rundown of the advice you'll get:
Thank you for your detailed post. I've already budgeted for quality safety gear, fuel, insurance, and the $1k for my brother's bike was most of my maintenance fund. $4k cash is my leftover money for starting this hobby. As my financial situation and riding experience change, so will the bikes I own.

I don't mind an old, ugly, and slow bike for my first. We have an actuary in the family so I've no delusions about being an exception to dropping or not getting hurt. Also, I've worked at a Level 1 trauma center where I saw many motorcyclist injuries and deaths. As a result, since my dream bikes are the RSV4, F4rr, and the Panigale, I want to start riding the 'safe' way. These sport-bikes require respect and exemplary riding skills which my first bike will help establish. The 250/300cc bikes are a means to an end. The dealer-bought financed option is for peace of mind on maintenance issues.

I will take my time. I'm already a defensive driver in my sedan; I'll be even more cautious riding the bike. ATGATT for sure, and I'll mostly ride during great weather and/or at night when there are fewer drivers on the road. I found out that two other people at work ride so that will help a lot.
Mustapha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2014, 07:36 AM   #23
Mustapha
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Houston, TX
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 31

Experience: 9-12 months

Bike(s):
2014 Kawasaki Ninja 300 ABS









What are this forum's thoughts on ABS for a beginner's bike? The dealer-bought option has ABS as it's become more popular for recent entry-level bikes.

Older riders say non-ABS teaches you threshold braking, and in the event ABS fails (because electronics are unreliable), you'll lock up your bike in a panic. ABS fans says you'll forget ABS is there and you'll still learn threshold braking. A panic situation will happen, and when it does, you'll be glad ABS is there rookie or not.
Mustapha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2014, 07:52 AM   #24
loosenoose
veteran novice
 
loosenoose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: montgomery
Feedback Rating: (2)
Posts: 4,155

Experience: 7 years

Bike(s):
07 sv650!




Member Garage


Buy a naked sv650! 4000 is a huge budget for a first bike. Get a cheap sv, take it to a good shop like motorcycles unlimited and have them check it out and fix anything that might be worn out or broken.
The sv650 is an easy bike to learn on and a fun bike to continue riding. It was my first bike and i wish i had never sold it.
Dont buy new. You might drop it, which kills resale value. You might also wind up not getting the hang of operating a motorcycle, or you may realize this is not for you.
loosenoose is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2014, 02:45 PM   #25
Mr.P
Driving Duh-Bus
 
Mr.P's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Sugarland
Feedback Rating: (5)
Posts: 4,759

Experience: 10+ years
Trackdays: 10+

Bike(s):
CBR1000RR






ABS is foolproof and the best thing you could ever buy to keep you on two wheels, versus on the concrete. Ninja 300 ABS is probably the best bet.

Get me that F4i, I'll clean it up for you for next to nothing. Put it on craigslist for $2500 - $2800. Then you'll have $5,500 for an ABS equipped brand new 300, cash.

Never finance a bike, unless you absolutely have to have full coverage insurance to sleep at night. The insurance can be more than the bike payment.

With bikes, cash is best. Easy come, easy go. Don't buy over your $$ comfort level just to have 100% of your investment doing somersaults down the road next to you.
__________________
Faster and Faster, Slowly! BRAWP it like its hot, BRAWP it like its hot.
Mr.P is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2014, 10:02 PM   #26
CombatM0NKEY
Call me TOOTs..
 
CombatM0NKEY's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Houston
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 1,481

Experience: 4-8 months

Bike(s):
1995 Honda Shadow 600VLX

Honda Xr50


Member Garage





Send a message via AIM to CombatM0NKEY Send a message via MSN to CombatM0NKEY Send a message via Yahoo to CombatM0NKEY
I'd be interested in that F4i as well. looking at the sprockets, doesn't seem like it was stunted.. kekeke.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by BaoPee View Post
you need to tell trey, "stop asking asian riders for BP dummies"...
CombatM0NKEY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2014, 10:55 PM   #27
tunaluna
Thread killer
 
tunaluna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: San Marcos.
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 827

Experience: 3 years
Trackdays: 1

Bike(s):
07 Ninja 250 sold
06 cbr F4i sold
04 gsx 600


Member Garage





F4i F4i
__________________
I'm that short kid at the SE meets.
tunaluna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 12:59 AM   #28
holycost
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Manvel
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 107


Bike(s):
2006 Harley Davidson VRSCD Nightrod
2002 Kawasaki ZR7








I rode my buell blast for a month then moved into my zr7 wasn't that bad at all. Someone was selling a Kawasaki 2003 z750
holycost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 10:04 AM   #29
Ninjeff
Senior Member
 
Ninjeff's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 143

Experience: 5 years
Trackdays: 7

Bike(s):
2007 Honda CBR600rr
1995 Suzuki GS500e (sold)
2009 Kawasaki Ninja 650r (sold)
2006 Kawasaki Ninja 250r (sold)






Well, here is the thing from someone who has owned most of the "beginner" variations on sport bikes. Check out my list. I like where your head is at as far as MSF course first, already have $ saved for gear (invest in the good mid range stuff, you'll be happy you did and wont have to "repurchase it" later)

The smaller bikes - 250s/300/500s etc don't TEACH you better, but they are easier to LEARN on.

The facts are this, you WILL screw up. You will do something wrong. Thats what learning is if you already knew how to do it perfect, you would riding in MotoGP. On a smaller bike...250 for example...the margin for error is greater. It wont bite you in the as quick as a 600.

You will probably drop the clutch too quick, or accidently grab a handful of throttle when you accidently hit that bump, you will come into a turn too hot, you will forget to put the kick stand down.

But, that's ok! We all do it, we have all been there! But on a 250 the margin is really large, so any one of those screw ups wont really get you into super hot water.

It is totally possible to learn on a 600. You hear all the excuses all the time. Personally, i chose NOT to because (though i am an overly responsible rider) the last thing i i wanted to do was live in fear of my own motorcycle. While learning i didnt want to worry constantly about the bike biting me. So I started on a 250 -which still commands that you respect it- but i found my enjoyment was great and i didnt "fear" the power. It allowed me to learn and grow.

I "out grew" it in about 2 years, and was ready to move on, but i got pretty much what i paid for it back when i sold it. Made the jump to a 500, then a 650 twin, and now a 600 Super Sport now that i ride track. Its been a great progression, and honestly...HONESTLY....i wish i would have kept that 250.
That bike was fun!


Another good way to put it, if someone was just learning to drive a car (like just got their license) would you hand them a BMW M3 or a 911 to learn on? Probably not.

Same logic applies here.

All that being said, BUY YOUR GEAR FIRST!
Helmet - jacket - gloves - boots - pants.


ATGATT.


Be safe and, imo, you're doing it right!
Ninjeff is offline   Reply With Quote
Liked this post:
Old 03-18-2014, 01:18 PM   #30
Morphish
Fast for a Commuter
 
Morphish's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: SW Houston
Feedback Rating: (1)
Posts: 424

Experience: 2 years
Trackdays: 1

Bike(s):
2004 Suzuki Katana B12
2005 Triumph Rocket ]I[
1983 Honda GL1100 (sold)







<--- I started on a 1200. No regrets.

But all the stuff about making mistakes, dropping it, etc... All that is true. Still, it's an amazing machine that I feel like I am just now starting to truly appreciate.

The F4i looks like it's in good shape to me. Get Patrick to check it out for you, budget some repairs, and go that route. If he says its not worth the trouble, then it's not. He's a straight shooter.

As far as ABS goes - it's worth knowing how to apply the brakes without all the electronics helping you, but since a handful of front brake with ABS doesn't = crash, I'm in favor. Pretty much, I'm in favor of stuff that can save you in a tight spot, so ABS is a great thing to have. It doesn't go into the MUST category (like working seatbelts in a car, for example), but if the option is there for a reasonable price, I'd go for it.
Morphish is offline   Reply With Quote
Liked this post:
Old 03-18-2014, 01:52 PM   #31
Jae
Kilted Basterd
 
Jae's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Richmond
Feedback Rating: (9)
Posts: 5,076

Experience: 9 years

Bike(s):
Naked Sprint
Russian POS
Angry Max/Tub
Pile o' Hyosungs

Member Garage


Quote:
Originally Posted by Morphish View Post
<--- I started on a 1200. No regrets.

But all the stuff about making mistakes, dropping it, etc... All that is true. Still, it's an amazing machine that I feel like I am just now starting to truly appreciate.

The F4i looks like it's in good shape to me. Get Patrick to check it out for you, budget some repairs, and go that route. If he says its not worth the trouble, then it's not. He's a straight shooter.

As far as ABS goes - it's worth knowing how to apply the brakes without all the electronics helping you, but since a handful of front brake with ABS doesn't = crash, I'm in favor. Pretty much, I'm in favor of stuff that can save you in a tight spot, so ABS is a great thing to have. It doesn't go into the MUST category (like working seatbelts in a car, for example), but if the option is there for a reasonable price, I'd go for it.
Out of curiosity, did you get your kat12 from ST675? (I think that's who bought my old B12 engine, anyway)
__________________
Keeping the "F-U" in "fun"
Jae is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 02:23 PM   #32
Morphish
Fast for a Commuter
 
Morphish's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: SW Houston
Feedback Rating: (1)
Posts: 424

Experience: 2 years
Trackdays: 1

Bike(s):
2004 Suzuki Katana B12
2005 Triumph Rocket ]I[
1983 Honda GL1100 (sold)







Quote:
Originally Posted by Jae View Post
Out of curiosity, did you get your kat12 from ST675? (I think that's who bought my old B12 engine, anyway)
Yup! Still going strong.

It's a great bike.
Morphish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 02:30 PM   #33
brandontx
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Houston
Feedback Rating: (1)
Posts: 4,751

Experience: 1-3 months
Trackdays: 1

Bike(s):
2008 Husqvarna SM 510
2008 Yamaha YZ250F








I would just get a sporty naked bike like an FZ6 or SV650. Way easier to ride at slower speeds and around town. Riding a sport bike around town blows. Most who say differently have only owned a sport bike and nothing else. I said "most" so save your "I like my sport bike better than" comments.
brandontx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 03:51 PM   #34
Jae
Kilted Basterd
 
Jae's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Richmond
Feedback Rating: (9)
Posts: 5,076

Experience: 9 years

Bike(s):
Naked Sprint
Russian POS
Angry Max/Tub
Pile o' Hyosungs

Member Garage


Quote:
Originally Posted by Morphish View Post
Yup! Still going strong.

It's a great bike.
Ha, thought I recognized the exhaust in your avatar. Testament to how bulletproof those engines are, you're at least the 4th forum member to have owned that engine, as I bought the bandit from klassik back in '09. I've regretted getting rid of that Bandit and have been considering getting another.
__________________
Keeping the "F-U" in "fun"
Jae is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 06:27 PM   #35
holycost
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Manvel
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 107


Bike(s):
2006 Harley Davidson VRSCD Nightrod
2002 Kawasaki ZR7








I agree with this as there were times I almost dropped my buell on 610 at a stop when someone cut in front of me in traffic, just learning the weight of the bike and how it handles is important to be comfortable with. Moving to my 750 after a month of riding wasn't too bad for me but I ride everyday so o had daily experience riding. I would not spend too much on a first bike. Most beginner bikes can be bought for under 2 grand and sold nearly for what you paid for it as they are in demand. That being said if you want a bike to learn on and don't plan on moving up for awhile then buy a nice one and ride til you save more money for an upgrade. But if you only want to buy one bike for awhile then buy a used one that's around 600cc or so. But if that bike is fixable I would fix it and ride it. Seems like an inexpensive fix, and parts for older bikes can be purchased cheap on eBay or at least you can find them online.

See how you feel after the msf course and start out riding in your neighborhood only for awhile. Before I rode on freeways and daily I rode around my neighborhood for two weeks. Granted j live in the country and have more roads but I would still just ride on back roads and secluded areas first. Then try riding on freeways in early mornings on weekends with light traffic like I did. Its not hard but just different and more to watch for and getting over being intimidated. It'll be how you feel but I personally like having more room to grow into instead of being stuck at a certain level.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ninjeff View Post
Well, here is the thing from someone who has owned most of the "beginner" variations on sport bikes. Check out my list. I like where your head is at as far as MSF course first, already have $ saved for gear (invest in the good mid range stuff, you'll be happy you did and wont have to "repurchase it" later)

The smaller bikes - 250s/300/500s etc don't TEACH you better, but they are easier to LEARN on.

The facts are this, you WILL screw up. You will do something wrong. Thats what learning is if you already knew how to do it perfect, you would riding in MotoGP. On a smaller bike...250 for example...the margin for error is greater. It wont bite you in the as quick as a 600.

You will probably drop the clutch too quick, or accidently grab a handful of throttle when you accidently hit that bump, you will come into a turn too hot, you will forget to put the kick stand down.

But, that's ok! We all do it, we have all been there! But on a 250 the margin is really large, so any one of those screw ups wont really get you into super hot water.

It is totally possible to learn on a 600. You hear all the excuses all the time. Personally, i chose NOT to because (though i am an overly responsible rider) the last thing i i wanted to do was live in fear of my own motorcycle. While learning i didnt want to worry constantly about the bike biting me. So I started on a 250 -which still commands that you respect it- but i found my enjoyment was great and i didnt "fear" the power. It allowed me to learn and grow.

I "out grew" it in about 2 years, and was ready to move on, but i got pretty much what i paid for it back when i sold it. Made the jump to a 500, then a 650 twin, and now a 600 Super Sport now that i ride track. Its been a great progression, and honestly...HONESTLY....i wish i would have kept that 250.
That bike was fun!


Another good way to put it, if someone was just learning to drive a car (like just got their license) would you hand them a BMW M3 or a 911 to learn on? Probably not.

Same logic applies here.

All that being said, BUY YOUR GEAR FIRST!
Helmet - jacket - gloves - boots - pants.


ATGATT.


Be safe and, imo, you're doing it right!
holycost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 07:28 PM   #36
Flip Flop
Ordained Minister
 
Flip Flop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Cypress
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 10,667

Experience: 1 year

Bike(s):
2006 SV650S(sold)(happy now?)
Toes Ducati Multistrada(what now buck?)








+1 on the SV650...maybe i am biased but you get a lot of sv650 for 4 grand. It's not overly powerful like the f4i, but it's lightweight and powerful enough to keep you entertained for years. it's also low maintenance, known for reliability and if you do need to do work on it, there is a huge aftermarket support group with cheap used parts readily available.

other than that maybe option one. With an old bike like the f4i you have no idea what could potentially go wrong during a period of time when you want to focus on developing riding skills, not mechanic skills.
Flip Flop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2014, 07:35 PM   #37
flat tire
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 17

Experience: 3 years


'05 EX250 (sold)
'95 CBR1000F (sold)
'00 CBR600F4 (sold)






A bike like the F4i is not that old and will be solid if it wasn't abused. I recommend learning to wrench on whichever bike you get so you can assess for yourself whether your bike is safe to ride rather than take someone else's word for it. I would say the F4i is a reasonable choice if you don't mind scaring the out of yourself on it. It's got too much power for most new riders but you can safely learn on it if you're both careful AND lucky.
flat tire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2014, 01:41 PM   #38
Rayinhouston
Senior Member
 
Rayinhouston's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Hou/Richmond
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 200

Experience: 10+ years
Trackdays: 3

Bike(s):
1998 Valk
1984 Honda V65 Sabre
KLR-650
1976 DT-400
Suzuki T-350 C-Z 400, Husky 360c, 71 SL-70 "hotrod"






Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick View Post
From the pics the F4i doesn't look bad.
Does it currently run?
Bring it by and I'll do a visual inspection and test drive at no charge and let you know if it's a viable option.
+1
__________________
P. Raymond Johnson Jr.
Back in TX. for now...
"live life"
Rayinhouston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2014, 01:58 PM   #39
Bluestreak06
Maine-ah
 
Bluestreak06's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Tomball
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 2,171

Experience: 10+ years

Bike(s):
2011 Hayabusa
2006 GSXR-600 (sold)
1981 yamaha XS 650(sold)


Member Garage


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mustapha View Post
I appreciate your generous offer, Patrick. Yes, it runs. Unfortunately, your shop is 25 miles/35 minutes away from my house. After this week's MSF course, I'll remain wary of that distance with such a powerful bike. Perhaps I can arrange delivery of the bike to your shop or ask my brother to ride it for me. I hope to see you by the end of the month.
If getting it there is an issue....there are plenty of us on here with trucks/trailers that dont mind helping out....
__________________


Quote:
Originally Posted by kibitzer View Post
If you don't shake it after you pee the terrorists win.
Ben C.
Bluestreak06 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Advertisement


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:32 AM.


MotoHouston.com is not responsible for the content posted by users.
Privacy Policy