MotoHouston.com MotoHouston.com
Register Members List Member Map Media Calendar Garage Forum Home Mark Forums Read

Go Back   MotoHouston.com > General Discussion > General Discussion (Moto Related)
Forgot info?

Welcome to MotoHouston.com! You are currently viewing our forums as a guest which gives you limited access to the community. By joining our free community you will have access to great discounts from our sponsors, the ability to post topics, communicate privately with other members, respond to polls, upload content, free email, classifieds, and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free, join our community!

Register Today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.


Like us on Facebook! Regular shirt GIVEAWAYS and more

Advertisement

Reply
Share This Thread: 
Subscribe to this Thread Thread Tools
Old 03-31-2013, 03:39 PM   #1
jrm1316
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 14

Experience: 1 year

Bike(s):
2007 Yamaha FZ6









Top Tier Fuel/Valero Gas

Found this thread interesting, makes me think twice now about using Valero or other non top tier fuels

Valero Gasoline Problems

Last edited by a forum moderator; 03-31-2013 at 04:24 PM.
jrm1316 is offline   Reply With Quote
Advertisement
Old 03-31-2013, 04:24 PM   #2
Helios
Back again again...
 
Helios's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: West Houston
Feedback Rating: (9)
Posts: 12,674

Experience: 3 years

Bike(s):
06 Silver Gixxer




Member Garage





Edited, original link good now.
__________________
"Man is least himself when he talks in his own person.
Give him a mask, and he will tell you the truth."
~Wilde
Helios is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2013, 04:36 PM   #3
Robby1227
Senior Member
 
Robby1227's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Seabrook
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 160

Experience: 1-3 months

Bike(s):
2005 DR-Z400SM









I've always noticed it, even in my ranger(which is by no means a performance engine of any sort, but try telling that to my right foot). It would pick up a random miss on cheaper gas, shell gas would clear it right back up.

Also as a note no matter what brand you buy - if its anything other than a car run premium gas. Lawnmower, bike, boat, etc. premium has less ethanol and doesn't go bad near as quick as regular unleaded.
Robby1227 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2013, 05:19 PM   #4
NeedySV
Senior Member
 
NeedySV's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Humble
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 556

Experience: 10+ years
Trackdays: 1

Bike(s):
SV1000K6









I won't say what pipeline company I work for, but we receive, ship, and load a TON of Valero gasoline across our truck rack. Most people don't realize that most refined petroleum product tank farms have what are called fungible tanks. We put over three different refiners gasoline into one tank unless they have a lease agreement with us for one single tank. Shell is the only company that currently leases a specific tank for their various grades of gasoline. That same gas is pumped to our truck rack and loaded into transport trucks headed to the stores. The only difference is the additive injected into the gas as the truck is loaded. Every refiner calls their additive something different...techron,etc.
NeedySV is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2013, 05:21 PM   #5
NeedySV
Senior Member
 
NeedySV's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Humble
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 556

Experience: 10+ years
Trackdays: 1

Bike(s):
SV1000K6









Also as a note no matter what brand you buy - if its anything other than a car run premium gas. Lawnmower, bike, boat, etc. premium has less ethanol and doesn't go bad near as quick as regular unleaded.[/QUOTE]

All of the gas loaded at my facility is injected with 10% ethanol. Reg, mid-grade and premium. You're benefiting from the premium because of the higher octane.
NeedySV is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2013, 12:40 PM   #6
Volfy
Fava Beans & a Chianti
 
Volfy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: SW Houston
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 3,504

Experience: 10+ years
Trackdays: 1

Bike(s):
'15 300RR
'15 250XCF-W
'14 Trophy SE
'10 VFR1200F
'05 GSXR600 (track)

Member Garage





The net is full gasoline of horror stories. Brand name matter to some extent, but you'd be far better off buying gas at a busy gas station with high traffic - regardless of brand. My cars have been fed mostly at our local Kroger pumps, which during the day is often stacked 3-deep with cars waiting to gas up cheap. I bet gas doesn't stay in those underground tank for more than a day before getting sucked out and refueled by tankers. Never had any problems with my cars for years now. I use a bottle of Techron every few months just to be sure. Probably overkill.

Small engines like generators, lawn mowers and pressure washer I treat differently. They sit unused for long periods, have simple carbs, and are much more sensitive to ethanol and bad gas. So I get premium at the corner Chevron or Shell, add fuel stabilizer, start them up every months, and drain the tanks every 6months or so.

All my bikes are FI and so behave more like cars than these small engines. With the exception of the track bunny, they all get ridden fairly regularly, so stale gas is not like ly, given the relatively small fuel tanks. Even if your bike only gets ridden on Sundays, there is little to worry about, as long as you gas up at busy gas stations.
Volfy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2013, 12:51 PM   #7
Bigshankhank
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Cypress
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 1,231

Experience: 10+ years

Bike(s):
1972 Aermacchi Sprint SX350
1972 Honda CL175 K5
1978 Kawasaki KE100
1978 Kawasaki KE250
1970 Suzuki TC90






Quote:
Originally Posted by Volfy View Post
Small engines like generators, lawn mowers and pressure washer I treat differently. They sit unused for long periods, have simple carbs, and are much more sensitive to ethanol and bad gas. So I get premium at the corner Chevron or Shell, add fuel stabilizer, start them up every months, and drain the tanks every 6months or so.
The problem isn't so much ethanol (although that is a problem) but rather than EPA requires these engines be set up to run so lean coupled with the fact that they typically have non-adjustable carbs. So they already run like , and when you leave gas in them, they gum up very quickly. With the exception of my lawn mower which during th spring and summer gets run almost every weekend, I drain the gas out of all my small engine tools after every use, then let the engine run until the carb is dry.
Bigshankhank is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2013, 01:09 PM   #8
DAT GUY
Moderator
 
DAT GUY's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 1982
Location: Spring
Feedback Rating: (3)
Posts: 2,923

Experience: 7 years
Trackdays: 10+

Bike(s):
95 Sportster 1200









I used to get better mpg from Valero... would check the mpg every time I filled up until the odometer stopped working.

oh well
DAT GUY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2013, 02:23 PM   #9
Volfy
Fava Beans & a Chianti
 
Volfy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: SW Houston
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 3,504

Experience: 10+ years
Trackdays: 1

Bike(s):
'15 300RR
'15 250XCF-W
'14 Trophy SE
'10 VFR1200F
'05 GSXR600 (track)

Member Garage





Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigshankhank View Post
The problem isn't so much ethanol (although that is a problem) but rather than EPA requires these engines be set up to run so lean coupled with the fact that they typically have non-adjustable carbs. So they already run like , and when you leave gas in them, they gum up very quickly. With the exception of my lawn mower which during th spring and summer gets run almost every weekend, I drain the gas out of all my small engine tools after every use, then let the engine run until the carb is dry.
Yap. The ethanol content makes the lean running worse, because the stoichiometric (ideal air-fuel mix) ratio is substantially lower for ethanol (9:1) than gasoline (14.7:1). The more ethanol there is in the mix, the more lean these small engines with simple carbs would run. So they run hot and like shiite, and can't tolerate any small carb problem.

Most cars these day have lambda (O2) sensors that actively varies the fuel mixture based on closed loop feedback, so they are less affected. Some motorcycle also have O2 sensors, but then a lot of guys bypass them and install PC that then richens the shiite out of the mixture anyway.
Volfy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2013, 03:00 PM   #10
HMFIC
Senior Member
 
HMFIC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Tierra de Azucar
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 1,812

Experience: 10+ years

Bike(s):
08 Super Duke R
08 YZ450F
Santa Cruz Blur 4x
09 YZ250F






I used Kroger & Valero 90% of the time. No probs....
__________________
Frank
HMFIC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2013, 06:05 PM   #11
jrm1316
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 14

Experience: 1 year

Bike(s):
2007 Yamaha FZ6









Very interesting, thanks to NeedySV for the info, I try to purchase at Shell when its at a reasonable price
jrm1316 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2013, 08:32 PM   #12
Jesse H
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Feedback Rating: (5)
Posts: 428

Experience: 10+ years

Bike(s):
05 Harley Road King









Quote:
Originally Posted by NeedySV View Post
I won't say what pipeline company I work for, but we receive, ship, and load a TON of Valero gasoline across our truck rack. Most people don't realize that most refined petroleum product tank farms have what are called fungible tanks. We put over three different refiners gasoline into one tank unless they have a lease agreement with us for one single tank. Shell is the only company that currently leases a specific tank for their various grades of gasoline. That same gas is pumped to our truck rack and loaded into transport trucks headed to the stores. The only difference is the additive injected into the gas as the truck is loaded. Every refiner calls their additive something different...techron,etc.
I see the same tanker company delivering at different gas stations in my area. All different brands.
__________________
МОΛΏΝ ΛΑΒΈ
Jesse H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2013, 08:38 PM   #13
BADASSVMAX
Senior Member
 
BADASSVMAX's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: houston
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 536

Experience: 10+ years
Trackdays: 4

Bike(s):
16 R1
09 VMAX
05 R6 sold
04 warrior sold
03 interceptor sold






I use seafoam or Yamaha fuel med once a month for maintance.bike runs cleans keeps injectors and valve running right.The best gas for my bike is Chevron.I have tested all the major brands,Mpg and horsepower.knocking.I know all bikes run different.Just try for yourself.
BADASSVMAX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2013, 05:33 AM   #14
grsa
Senior Member
 
grsa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: West Houston-Katy
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 4,433

Experience: 5 years
Trackdays: 2

Bike(s):
V-Strom 650
Triumph Sprint ST 1050
Moto Guzzi Breva 750ie







In the article this was stated x I just poured the last of the lawnmower and 2 stroke mix into the RAV's gas tank and I'll fill the gas cans with Exxon or Shell this week.c putting a two stroke mix in a.car does. Not sound like a good idea.maybe the amount is not enough to make a difference.
grsa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2013, 09:05 AM   #15
Volfy
Fava Beans & a Chianti
 
Volfy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: SW Houston
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 3,504

Experience: 10+ years
Trackdays: 1

Bike(s):
'15 300RR
'15 250XCF-W
'14 Trophy SE
'10 VFR1200F
'05 GSXR600 (track)

Member Garage





"...He switched to Exxon or Shell and it cleared up. He used these brands in his pickumup truck and got +2 MPG."

I'd question the credibility of anybody who claims +2 mpg by fueling up at a different gas station.
Volfy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2013, 09:25 AM   #16
Halen
Suerte O Muerte
 
Halen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Houston .:. TX
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 377

Experience: 10+ years
Trackdays: 10+

Bike(s):
2013 BMW S1000rr
2013 Triumph Daytona 675R
2008 Ducati Monster S4RS Tricolore
2001 Yamaha Champions Edition R6
2004 Honda NSR50

Member Garage





Quote:
Originally Posted by Volfy View Post
"...He switched to Exxon or Shell and it cleared up. He used these brands in his pickumup truck and got +2 MPG."

I'd question the credibility of anybody who claims +2 mpg by fueling up at a different gas station.
Agreed. He'd have to simulate his driving from the previous fill-up to correctly measure the differences. Unless he lives in a lab and has a dyno, I'm going to say this did not happen.
Halen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2013, 09:47 AM   #17
FoxRider
Thumpitty thump
 
FoxRider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Katy
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 295

Experience: 10+ years
Trackdays: 10+

Bike(s):
1997 DR 650
Pitster 150


1984 Suburban






I've been commuting on my SV1K for 4 years now, and after 28,000 miles, and countless fillups I can tell all of yall confidently with my experience in testing. Yes, I am a biased person when I come to a certain product or manufacturer that I like, however, I do my research very well before I stick with something specific. I stick with old Chevy trucks because their cheap, easy to work on, and parts can even be found lying on the side of the road. I like Suzuki motorcycles because they're comfortable for my body build, and have plenty of low end torque which matches my riding style.

For gasoline, I have tested Shell, Valero, grocery stores, Exxon, and Chevron/Texaco. From my findings and testings on the city streets, FM road day trips, interstate highway road trips, and even track days, I have found Chevron and Texaco fuels with Techron significantly out perform the other brands of equal octane ratings in performance, and mpg. With Techron fuels my average commuting tank lasts 140 miles, Exxon comes in at a close second with 130, but Shell, Valero, and grocery store fuels were all very poor ranging between 115-125 commuting miles per tank. These tests were all done by myself over the years of commuting back and forth from work, school, and entertainment with tame road and freeway speeds, and 3-5 full throttle overtakes per tank.

I do not recommend 'performance gaining' fuel additives such as octane boosters because they will make motors run hotter. I have boiled all of the oil out of a motor before and completely destroyed it. However, I do use Marvel Mystery Oil in my crank cases and on occasional fill ups, and I sometimes do add Lucas Fuel Injector cleaner, both at about every 3-5 tanks.
__________________
BRAP!
FoxRider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2013, 09:54 AM   #18
FoxRider
Thumpitty thump
 
FoxRider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Katy
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 295

Experience: 10+ years
Trackdays: 10+

Bike(s):
1997 DR 650
Pitster 150


1984 Suburban






Also, may I add: for older trucks and cars, and even some late model vehicles, I have found Techron fuels to provide substantial performance, efficiency, and reliability gains. In our work truck, a '95 F150 with a FI5.0 with 102k miles, the motor doesn't idle well, and will sometimes stall and die out if not running Techron fuels. My personal 4x4 project Suburban with a 35 year old 7.4L with Edelbrock intake and carb, refuses to idle without Techron Premium fuels. With lower grade octanes or even other brands it will knock, pop, and even backfire. My friend has an '06 Scion tC with 140k miles and with his OCD driving and testing skills also swears by Techron for less engine knock and vibration, and higher fuel mileage for frequent road trips to North Carolina and New Mexico.
__________________
BRAP!
FoxRider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2013, 10:17 AM   #19
TheVirus
Original OG
 
TheVirus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: West Side
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 1,737

Experience: 9 years
Trackdays: 10+

Bike(s):
2001 SV650S
2009 *Secret*








Quote:
Originally Posted by Volfy View Post
"...He switched to Exxon or Shell and it cleared up. He used these brands in his pickumup truck and got +2 MPG."

I'd question the credibility of anybody who claims +2 mpg by fueling up at a different gas station.
Agreed because its all about how you drive, When you are driving and what the driving conditions are. The fuel will make such a small amount of difference

You would be wrong if you think all gas stations fuel is different. They are all the same fuel ( for the most part) just the additive is different. They pretty much mix it all.
__________________
The First 48
TheVirus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2013, 12:20 PM   #20
FoxRider
Thumpitty thump
 
FoxRider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Katy
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 295

Experience: 10+ years
Trackdays: 10+

Bike(s):
1997 DR 650
Pitster 150


1984 Suburban






I completely disagree that all gas stations provide the same fuel. If it were the same stuff they'd be the same company. Each company has its own set of standards for the gas the produce, and the stations where they dispense it all. Of course their additives are different. Some have octane booster, some have more powerful detergents, and some produce lower emissions. Saying that all gas is the same and it is futile to be choosy is just silly to me. Market competition and laws dictate the companies must have different products, procedures, and storefronts. The gas is different and I can't be convinced otherwise. Sure, some of it may be shipped in similar containers, but even if the same fuel with the same additives is sent to different brand stores, those individual stores, even among the same company, will have different standards of cleanliness and machinery to deliver and store the fuel. To say they're all generally identical is just too ignorant for my OCD brain.
__________________
BRAP!
FoxRider is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Advertisement


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:27 AM.


MotoHouston.com is not responsible for the content posted by users.
Privacy Policy