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Old 02-20-2013, 01:30 PM   #41
bluewave18
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Biking Makes Better Drivers

I did say that are not all avoidable
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Old 02-20-2013, 02:38 PM   #42
Volfy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluewave18 View Post
It's more of a pointing in the escape direction than hugging the lane. I am speaking from my own experience and my proven ability to pull this maneuver off. I cut decent lights and can cover 0-60' in about 1.52 seconds at the track. I'm not too bad on the street either as long as I can hook. If its even sketchy looking I will prepare to jump to a safer spot
Add another 2-3 sec of assessment/decision/reaction time... 1 sec if you are superhuman sharp, and it is still an eternity when you have only fraction of a second.

As for jumping to a safer spot... If it were truly a safer spot, why wouldn't you go and stay there in the first place? You don't because what's a safe spot changes by the second. That means you will have to assess that constantly - and likely again just before you take evasive action, or you risk jumping in front of a semi to avoid getting nailed by a Fiat.

Hey, I sure hope you are right. I just know that over-confidence can be just as deadly.
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Old 02-20-2013, 02:41 PM   #43
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Biking Makes Better Drivers

Geez man. Don't take it so personally. My record is spotless so far. I'm confident in my abilities so far. That's all I got.
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Old 02-20-2013, 03:42 PM   #44
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Good discussion here. I spend most of my riding vision scanning directed to what is in front of me and to the side threats particularly at intersections.

But, when I brake, or have close following cages I work to get out of their way. When stopped at lights and such I really watch my mirrors for closing cagers. I tend to point away from the center lane. I also flash my rear brake and sometimes even move my arms when vehicles are just appearing. I ready myself to dodge as vehicles close though.

I agree with Volfy after being rear ended several times by cars while in cars: usually they are impossible to avoid, there is insufficient warning or time to act.

I wish my Guzzi had a larger and brighter rear brake light. Maybe it is time to get a flashing LED add on?
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Old 02-20-2013, 05:24 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluewave18 View Post
I like the people who think they are great drivers because none of their 5 wrecks were their fault. If they were a great driver, they would have avoided the majority of their not at fault accidents
I have been in more than five wrecks and think I am a better driver. I cant even tell you how many wrecks I have been in.
Lets just call it experience.
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Old 02-21-2013, 09:30 AM   #46
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Another way to reduce rear enders

Since beginning riding, I have implemented a new (to me anyway) strategy for reducing rear end collisions.

In the cage or on the motorcycle.
1. If someone is tailgating me, I slow down and they usually pass. If they don't pass I put the gap they should have in front of me.
2. I strive to maintain at least a 4 second gap in front of me, and more when possible. I always (at least very slightly) brake when that gap disappears to rebuild my gap. On Houston multi-lane roads it is amazing how often you can keep a 4 (or more) second gap if you don't mind going just a tad slower than most every one else.
3. When turning, whenever possible I move into the turn lane farthest from the through traffic lanes. Folks have to act to get into the far left / right lanes. Therefor the dozy texters are found less often in the far lanes.
4. I rather quickly begin slowing far before the stop sign or as soon as the light (up to 12 seconds away) turns yellow or any other stoppage presents itself.
5. I roll up to the road blockage at an idle (while flashing my tail lights). I often avoid time spent at a full stop at lights with this step.
6. I leave a large gap between me and the stopped car in front.
7. I watch my rear view for approaching cars.
8. If a car comes up quickly from behind I wait till they get fairly close (to trigger them to stop) then I move forward.
9. On the bike I park somewhat diagonally to improve my visibility to other drivers (similar to what some PO's do on traffic stop) while staying in my lane. Meanwhile I position my handle bars so I can easily see what is behind me (front wheel is almost straight with lane).

10. The above serves to get the car directly behind me to slow without riding up my tail. The one thing that really worries me is if that car behind me suddenly swerves around and the guy behind him can't stop. Being in the far (not through traffic) turn lane helps to prevent this.

In my London cage I did get rear ended but we were going slow enough that no damage occurred.

Time will tell if I can keep Houston drivers from running in to me, but by taking an active approach I can force most folks behind me to SLOW down sooner. And less speed is far less energy in any crash.
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Old 02-21-2013, 09:36 AM   #47
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One other way biking has made me a better cage driver....

On the bike I began immediately braking whenever presented with a threat (whether or not the law requires me to yield the right of way). Now I do that in the cage as well (similar to what the fellow said about the driveway backer above).

Was recently driving a pickup truck on 59 when someone dropped a load into my lane. I immediately braked and that then gave me just enough time to affect my swerve at the last minute. So yeah, using biking techniques helped me avoid the accident that would "not have been my fault".
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Old 02-21-2013, 09:36 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by haleyscomet View Post
Since beginning riding, I have implemented a new (to me anyway) strategy for reducing rear end collisions.

In the cage or on the motorcycle.
1. If someone is tailgating me, I slow down and they usually pass. If they don't pass I put the gap they should have in front of me.
2. I strive to maintain at least a 4 second gap in front of me, and more when possible. I always (at least very slightly) brake when that gap disappears to rebuild my gap. On Houston multi-lane roads it is amazing how often you can keep a 4 (or more) second gap if you don't mind going just a tad slower than most every one else.
3. When turning, whenever possible I move into the turn lane farthest from the through traffic lanes. Folks have to act to get into the far left / right lanes. Therefor the dozy texters are found less often in the far lanes.
4. I rather quickly begin slowing far before the stop sign or as soon as the light (up to 12 seconds away) turns yellow or any other stoppage presents itself.
5. I roll up to the road blockage at an idle (while flashing my tail lights). I often avoid time spent at a full stop at lights with this step.
6. I leave a large gap between me and the stopped car in front.
7. I watch my rear view for approaching cars.
8. If a car comes up quickly from behind I wait till they get fairly close (to trigger them to stop) then I move forward.
9. On the bike I park somewhat diagonally to improve my visibility to other drivers (similar to what some PO's do on traffic stop) while staying in my lane. Meanwhile I position my handle bars so I can easily see what is behind me (front wheel is almost straight with lane).

10. The above serves to get the car directly behind me to slow without riding up my tail. The one thing that really worries me is if that car behind me suddenly swerves around and the guy behind him can't stop. Being in the far (not through traffic) turn lane helps to prevent this.

In my London cage I did get rear ended but we were going slow enough that no damage occurred.

Time will tell if I can keep Houston drivers from running in to me, but by taking an active approach I can force most folks behind me to SLOW down sooner. And less speed is far less energy in any crash.
This is how to drive.
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Old 02-21-2013, 09:52 PM   #49
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Busa club. why did you not mention that? that makes things all nice and peachy
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