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Old 01-30-2013, 02:16 PM   #41
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we are not talking about motorcycles, we are talking about SCOOTERS.
Ha! Keep 'em on topic bro!
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Old 01-30-2013, 02:17 PM   #42
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Did you get the rights to copy that? in any event good info
I have the PDF copy.. I can email it to u, if you like.
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Old 01-30-2013, 02:17 PM   #43
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Originally Posted by Posterchild2 View Post
Saw this first hand while sweeping on Sunday. The rider's entry speed was too hot and rather than use the engine and/or front brake to slow down, she panicked. Slammed the the rear brake, stood the bike straight up and lost the rear. And that's all she wrote.
Yeap, like i mentioned on Lucar's thread, i only use my rear brake to settle the chassis under hard front braking situations, but 95% of the times i do not brake so no need apply any rear brake. On back road rides, if you have to grab a handful of front brake that means you are pushing it and putting yourself and others around you in danger, i would recommend anyone to read "The Pace" before going on group rides!
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Old 01-30-2013, 02:17 PM   #44
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What is a rear brake?

Sorry noob question.
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Old 01-30-2013, 02:18 PM   #45
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Again sunday, youre riding your bike like a scooter. Easy
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Old 01-30-2013, 02:19 PM   #46
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What is a rear brake?

Sorry noob question.
Its for the street minded track boy.
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Old 01-30-2013, 02:19 PM   #47
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There is a brake on the back?
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Originally Posted by NewRider View Post
B0049ZCHL2 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by 392 View Post
What is a rear brake?

Sorry noob question.
I asked the same thing. Ivan clarified for me!
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Old 01-30-2013, 02:20 PM   #48
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Old 01-30-2013, 02:21 PM   #49
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I like turtles
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Old 01-30-2013, 02:22 PM   #50
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No street for u.
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Old 01-30-2013, 02:28 PM   #51
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Here is another Article about using rear bresk, this guy is an Expert in Advanced Riding Techniques.

This is a GREAT ARTICLE:

The Question is : What is the best motorcycle rear brake technique, and do I need one?

Answer
The rear brake is one of the least understood controls on a motorcycle. Many riders don't use the rear brake at all, most of the time claiming that it doesn't actually aid in stopping or slowing a motorcycle and that it too easily locks up the rear tire when trying to use it. Ask five different riders of varying skill and experience about their motorcycle rear brake technique, and you're likely to get five different answers. Probably the most popular answer is: "I don't use it!"

But, if you choose to give up using your rear brake, you are giving up stopping power, stability and finesse in controlling your motorcycle. So, the best motorcycle rear brake technique is to simply use it every time you use the front brake. If you practice this, eventually you will develop the necessary feel and familiarity with this control to employ more advanced use of the rear brake.

First, though, as with all your motorcycle's controls, the rear brake needs to be adjusted to fit your body and riding position, and we'll assume that its maintenance hasn't been overlooked (which includes clean calipers, sufficient brake pad material, and clean brake fluid to start with). Consult the service manual for your particular motorcycle to learn how to adjust the rear brake foot lever. It should be adjustable by raising and lowering the position of the lever so that you can comfortably reach it and press it down with your toe. If it is adjusted too high, it will be difficult to get your foot on top of the lever, if it is adjusted too low, it will feel awkward when you apply pressure. If it is not adjusted properly, you won't use it.

I recommend a course adjustment to start with and while riding, make note if the lever still feels out of adjustment. It should only take one or two followup adjustments to get it perfect.

Now that your rear brake is adjusted to comfortably fit you, make a conscious effort to use the rear brake every time you squeeze the front brake. Begin with a road that you are familiar with (such as a favorite back road) and start with a mild amount of pressure on the rear brake, feeling the difference it makes in stopping or slowing your motorcycle. You should notice a heightened level of control, a stronger sense of intimacy with your machine, and a better feel for the road.

As you progress with your new motorcycle rear brake technique, it will become second nature and you won't even think about it. You'll find yourself tapping the rear brake to settle a slightly uneasy chassis through a bumpy corner, and you will find its use as a way of "sampling" traction indispensable if you routinely ride in more adverse weather. During low speed maneuvers, such as in a parking lot, the rear brake can be used exclusively. The silly notion of never using the rear brake because it may lock up the rear tire unexpectedly will prove to be rubbish.

LINK: http://motorcycles.yoexpert.com/adva...e-a-30545.html
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Old 01-30-2013, 02:32 PM   #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TMAX View Post
Again sunday, youre riding your bike like a scooter. Easy
You have an open invitation to join our rides and prove your point with action instead of words anytime.

There has been so many failed attempts by you to convince MH that scooters are just like motorcycles, your journey for acceptance will be a never ending one for sure.

If the majority of the people are telling you that a panda bear is black and white but you choose to believe that they are pink, i suggest you keep it to yourself next time and people will have a much better perception of you as a "normal person", if you insist and try to convince people that pandas are pink people will just see you as another clown in the circus.
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Old 01-30-2013, 02:41 PM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunday_rider View Post
You have an open invitation to join our rides and prove your point with action instead of words anytime.

There has been so many failed attempts by you to convince MH that scooters are just like motorcycles, your journey for acceptance will be a never ending one for sure.

If the majority of the people are telling you that a panda bear is black and white but you choose to believe that they are pink, i suggest you keep it to yourself next time and people will have a much better perception of you as a "normal person", if you insist and try to convince people that pandas are pink people will just see you as another clown in the circus.
Haha. Ive been to an smr ride in the sw. The roads suck. That includes rr
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Old 01-30-2013, 02:45 PM   #54
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Scooter Braking Discussion

Notice in those quotes above, by "experts", ie. advanced
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Old 01-30-2013, 02:45 PM   #55
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Originally Posted by TMAX View Post
Haha. Ive been to an smr ride in the sw. The roads suck. That includes rr
it would be fair to say that pretty much all road sucks when you ride a scooter? Seriously, where is the adrenaline rush coming from?

Like i said, the invitation is still open..... i will make sure to make this ride more entertaining for you!
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Old 01-30-2013, 02:46 PM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cornerjunkie View Post
Here is another Article about using rear bresk, this guy is an Expert in Advanced Riding Techniques.

This is a GREAT ARTICLE:

The Question is : What is the best motorcycle rear brake technique, and do I need one?

Answer
The rear brake is one of the least understood controls on a motorcycle. Many riders don't use the rear brake at all, most of the time claiming that it doesn't actually aid in stopping or slowing a motorcycle and that it too easily locks up the rear tire when trying to use it. Ask five different riders of varying skill and experience about their motorcycle rear brake technique, and you're likely to get five different answers. Probably the most popular answer is: "I don't use it!"

But, if you choose to give up using your rear brake, you are giving up stopping power, stability and finesse in controlling your motorcycle. So, the best motorcycle rear brake technique is to simply use it every time you use the front brake. If you practice this, eventually you will develop the necessary feel and familiarity with this control to employ more advanced use of the rear brake.

First, though, as with all your motorcycle's controls, the rear brake needs to be adjusted to fit your body and riding position, and we'll assume that its maintenance hasn't been overlooked (which includes clean calipers, sufficient brake pad material, and clean brake fluid to start with). Consult the service manual for your particular motorcycle to learn how to adjust the rear brake foot lever. It should be adjustable by raising and lowering the position of the lever so that you can comfortably reach it and press it down with your toe. If it is adjusted too high, it will be difficult to get your foot on top of the lever, if it is adjusted too low, it will feel awkward when you apply pressure. If it is not adjusted properly, you won't use it.

I recommend a course adjustment to start with and while riding, make note if the lever still feels out of adjustment. It should only take one or two followup adjustments to get it perfect.

Now that your rear brake is adjusted to comfortably fit you, make a conscious effort to use the rear brake every time you squeeze the front brake. Begin with a road that you are familiar with (such as a favorite back road) and start with a mild amount of pressure on the rear brake, feeling the difference it makes in stopping or slowing your motorcycle. You should notice a heightened level of control, a stronger sense of intimacy with your machine, and a better feel for the road.

As you progress with your new motorcycle rear brake technique, it will become second nature and you won't even think about it. You'll find yourself tapping the rear brake to settle a slightly uneasy chassis through a bumpy corner, and you will find its use as a way of "sampling" traction indispensable if you routinely ride in more adverse weather. During low speed maneuvers, such as in a parking lot, the rear brake can be used exclusively. The silly notion of never using the rear brake because it may lock up the rear tire unexpectedly will prove to be rubbish.

LINK: http://motorcycles.yoexpert.com/adva...e-a-30545.html
Aaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhh-mennnnnnnnnnn
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Old 01-30-2013, 02:47 PM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunday_rider View Post
it would b fair to say that pretty much all road sucks when you ride a scooter?Seriously, where is the adrenaline rush coming from?
3090 much?
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Old 01-30-2013, 02:49 PM   #58
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Quote:
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No street for u.
Why not sir?
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Old 01-30-2013, 02:53 PM   #59
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I got a serious question for you, TMAX(scooter related), may I?
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Old 01-30-2013, 02:53 PM   #60
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