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Old 06-19-2012, 12:21 PM   #21
CaffeineRacer
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Well if it doesnt bounce.. then the coefficient of friction between the tire and the surface should be sufficient to keep it from sliding... you know the whole reason motorcycle riding works...
Shut up smart I realize that . I guess what I was saying is what is the determining cut off for when you need to and when you don't. Bike weight? If thats the case then I would think cruisers would never have to have the rear tied down. I suppose thinking about it though, by having the rear tied down it reduces the working load on the front straps to hold the bike upright, not just down to the trailer.
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Old 06-19-2012, 12:23 PM   #22
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Quote:
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Shut up smart I realize that . I guess what I was saying is what is the determining cut off for when you need to and when you don't. Bike weight? If thats the case then I would think cruisers would never have to have the rear tied down. I suppose thinking about it though, by having the rear tied down it reduces the working load on the front straps to hold the bike upright, not just down to the trailer.


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Old 06-19-2012, 01:31 PM   #23
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You also have to take into account the average as well as largest size bump in the road that you will encounter.
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Old 06-19-2012, 01:46 PM   #24
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Then you also need to take into account how many times the tire turns till it gets to 80mph, and how much air is in the tires, because u know cop tires have more air in them, and if the passenger has blond hair, also if her husband is taping this while they are on there honeymoon and towing a bike, also dont forget what color bike it is too and tons of other variables, its really best to have a new bike waiting at every track day and just give it away at the end of the day, that way you dont ever have to haul one
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Old 06-19-2012, 01:56 PM   #25
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I use bungee cords, makes the bike disappear from time to time, but very entertaining.





Actually, what Patrick said about a cycle cinch and two straps on the front. I will use the triple many times if easy to access.

I do actually use a bungee on the rear wheel just to keep it from hopping side to side. I have seen V Stroms bend bars more than once when strapped by them, but not any other bikes normally.

I drive well above the posted limit when hauling bikes and have never lost one (save for the V Strom that leaned over with the bent bar).
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Old 06-19-2012, 02:26 PM   #26
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You also have to take into account the average as well as largest size bump in the road that you will encounter.
I think we should begin conducting a state by state examination of road humps and bumps as well as bike weights, tire friction coefficients at different loads, and color correlations to design a massive bike tie down algorithm that we can then use IBM's sequoia supercomputer to calculate it all and establish a matrix covering every single possible combination of all said factors for future motorcycle trailering individuals to reference so that never again shall another bike be improperly tied down.
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Old 06-19-2012, 03:52 PM   #27
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If you think 2 straps up front is enough... try grabing the rear of your bike and sliding it side to side next time you have it tied down on a trailer. I actually do this regularly to center the bike on the trailer after I roll the front wheel into the chock, before I strap the end down. You don't need to tied it down hard, but you do need to make sure the tail doesn't move around while in transport.

A bike tied down standing upright sees nowhere near the same cornering forces as being ridden by a 150lbs rider banked into the turn. Neither does a slick trailer bed surface has near the same traction as rough concrete or asphalt.

But then again... it's your bike, so do as you deem fit. Me? I'd rather buy some extra insurance with less than $10 for a couple more straps.
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Old 06-19-2012, 04:16 PM   #28
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Like this. Straps on both handlebars attached to the rack, strap wrapped around the rear subframe attached to the back of your vehicle, straps holding the rack to the back of vehicle, and a chock screwed down to a 2x8 plank notched to fit onto the rack itself. Pretty ghetto (really I am sort of ashamed of it) but I drove it like this from Florida to here.
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Old 06-19-2012, 05:10 PM   #29
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I used two straps with those soft hookons around hte forks, compress halfway, then one or two straps on the rearwheel/pegs...towed a bike 3000miles like this
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Old 06-19-2012, 05:46 PM   #30
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Sure fire method and the bike only has to be on the kickstand. NO STRAPS INVOLVED.

Get the bike into the back of the truck and standing steady on the kick stand. Fill the bed of the truck with concrete. Wait 2 - 4 hours. Bike will not fall down.
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Old 06-19-2012, 06:52 PM   #31
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Sure fire method and the bike only has to be on the kickstand. NO STRAPS INVOLVED.

Get the bike into the back of the truck and standing steady on the kick stand. Fill the bed of the truck with concrete. Wait 2 - 4 hours. Bike will not fall down.
DO NOT DO THIS WITH A BIKE WITH ALUMINUM OR MAGNESIUM RIMS!!!!!!! The metal will react with the chemicals in the concrete and will corrode over time, causing a structural failure. A structural failure when it comes to your wheels is never a good thing. And normally I would dissuade people from hauling a bike on its side stand simply because it stresses the stand mounting points abnormally.
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Old 06-19-2012, 07:15 PM   #32
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I had the factory street fighter kit on my old Falco and I was able to bend the bars with small ratchet tiedowns.

After I saw the issue I started going with the lower triple. On my current bike and my titan, I started using the lower triple. If I'm in a truck without the bed rail system like my titan, I will go around the frame.

I also prefer to tie the rear down by going around the wheel or by going to the passenger pegs.
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