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Old 05-10-2011, 11:19 AM   #41
maxgs
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Lot's of fast guys got faster with Code.... just glance down through the list of names...


1981--Contracts with Kawasaki Motors Corp. to train dirtracker Wayne Rainey in roadracing techniques. The rest is history.

1982--Superbike champion Eddie Lawson agrees to write his notes and comments in Keith's first book after attending Superbike School sessions.

1983--Coaches Steve Wise for Honda race team. Steve was fearless but crashed a lot. He made it into the winners circle 11 out of the next 13 Superbike and Formula 1 races with Keith as his coach.

1984--Works with Superbike champion Wes Cooley for Kawasaki. Team Muzzy/Kawasaki staff member, Sparky Edmondson said. "What did you do to him, I've never seen anything like that before!" after Keith brought him from a string of distant 7th place type finishes to winners' circle after coaching him for only one race!

1984--Works with national champion dirtracker Ricky Graham to start his roadracing career for Honda.

1984--Works with national champion dirtracker Bubba Shobert to start his roadracing career for Honda. Bubba went on to win the Superbike championship.

1984--Starts training dirtracker Doug Chandler in roadracing. Doug wins 3Superbike Championships.

1984--Begins training Donnie Greene who goes on to win 3 National Championships after Keith's coaching.

1985--Wayne Rainey likes the material and agrees to write notes for the book.

1986--The Soft Science of Roadracing is published and is still the only workbook for racers. Daytona Winner Dave Sadowski later says, "I don't need you as a coach anymore, I have the book with all the answers!"

1989--Works with Thomas Stevens. Later becomes Superbike Champion.

1989--Coaches David Sadowski. Goes on to win Daytona and other races.

1989--Coaches Fred Merkel. Goes on to win world Superbike title.

1990--Coaches Dale Quarterly. Goes on to win national championship and quits crashing.

1990--Student Doug Chandler wins his first Superbike race, acknowledges Keith's coaching.

1990--Resumes coaching of Donnie Greene. Wins another National 250cc title.

1991--Starts coaching Scott Russell. Russell begins Superbike career and publicly acknowledges Keith's help. Wins USA and World Superbike Championships.

1991--Coaches Jake Zemke for a season. Jake later becomes national podium regular.

1991--Coaches Mike Smith. Mike goes on to win National Formula USA title.

1992--Coaches factory rider Jamie James.

1992--Chuck Graves becomes Code student. Wins Formula USA title.

1996--Ben Bostrom comes to school and then works with Keith.

1996--Eric Bostrom comes to school and consults with Keith on riding.

1996--Works with Roland Sands. Sands immediately quits crashing (one to three times per race) and goes on to win national title.

1997--Coaches Sean Higby. Higby becomes top twins competitor.

1998--Coaches John Kocinski. Wins World title next season.

2000--Consults with Chuck Sorensen. Chuck wins national 250 title again and again.
.
2005--Coaches Leon Camier. Becomes British Supersport Champ.

2005-'06--Starts coaching 9-year-old Peter Lenz, goes on to win 9 mini roadracing titles.

2006-'07--Coaches Josh Herrin for Graves Motorsports, wins first National.

2007--Coaches Australian Superbike Champion, Marty Craggill. Marty returns to the podium in AMA Formula Extreme.

2009-- Leon Camier, breaks all win and poll setting records and wins British Superbike championship. Leon is assisted through his stellar season by both British school director, Andy Ibbott and Keith.

2010--Leon Camier lands himself a factory ride with Team Aprillia, Keith coaches him to podium at Miller round of WSBK.

2010--School and Keith Code private student, Austin Dehaven, wins 2010 AMA Supersport title.

2010--School and Keith Code private student, Joe Roberts, is the only American chosen for European Red Bull Rookies Cup competition.

Last edited by maxgs; 05-10-2011 at 11:21 AM.
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Old 05-10-2011, 11:23 AM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maxgs View Post
points out just how subjective opinions on things like body position can be.
This is how I feel.
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Old 05-10-2011, 11:26 AM   #43
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This is a really funny, yet poignant thread on Keith's site regarding "expert" advice on WERA...

It's entitled "Can't believe the stuff I read (WERA Forum)

http://forums.superbikeschool.com/in...showtopic=2946

Some of the more humorous quotes...

"Incredible. I think what this demonstrates is that even veterans with loads of experience are apparently totally unaware of how the operate a bike or how it actually works! "

"Not surprisingly, there are lots of riders who are very fast, who don't have a clue as to why they go so fast and how the bike works. "
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Old 05-10-2011, 12:25 PM   #44
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That guy Mick Doohan should've gone to Keith Code's school, maybe he would have made a name of himself riding bikes.
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Old 05-10-2011, 12:41 PM   #45
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Originally Posted by cdill35 View Post
back of the seat while braking, which is all the way to the apex.
watch some folk wipe out trying to emulate that at a trackday near you soon


Quote:
Originally Posted by maxgs View Post
This is a really funny, yet poignant thread on Keith's site regarding "expert" advice on WERA...

It's entitled "Can't believe the stuff I read (WERA Forum)

http://forums.superbikeschool.com/in...showtopic=2946

Some of the more humorous quotes...

"Incredible. I think what this demonstrates is that even veterans with loads of experience are apparently totally unaware of how the operate a bike or how it actually works! "

"Not surprisingly, there are lots of riders who are very fast, who don't have a clue as to why they go so fast and how the bike works. "
which backs up what I've said for a while now, fast guys dont necessarily make good coaches

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Originally Posted by Irak View Post
That guy Mick Doohan should've gone to Keith Code's school, maybe he would have made a name of himself riding bikes.

no doubting code's credentials but does he have to make it so boring
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Old 05-10-2011, 02:58 PM   #46
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body position is everything when it comes to going fast. it's also about being comfortable sometimes. from the adjustments in your rearsets to the adjustments for the clipons. don't do setup everything like "that fast guy". also don't always do everything "the fast guy" does. Use their knowledge/experience/technique as a baseline, and be sure to adjust to what works and is comfortable for YOU.

as for me, i'm with cdill... i tend to try and move all my weight to the rear almost up until the apex, somewhere in those split seconds before the apex i automatically shift my body towards the tank and towards the inside of the turn.

to the comment about loading the front end.....
as you guys/gals gain experience and seat time, you'll find out that keeping the front end "loaded" to turn in is mostly done with trail braking, at times with engine decel, and some times with pure brute strength and heavy input on the handle bars.
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Old 05-10-2011, 03:22 PM   #47
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Old 05-10-2011, 03:44 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by houseofpain View Post
body position is everything when it comes to going fast. it's also about being comfortable sometimes. from the adjustments in your rearsets to the adjustments for the clipons. don't do setup everything like "that fast guy". also don't always do everything "the fast guy" does. Use their knowledge/experience/technique as a baseline, and be sure to adjust to what works and is comfortable for YOU.

as for me, i'm with cdill... i tend to try and move all my weight to the rear almost up until the apex, somewhere in those split seconds before the apex i automatically shift my body towards the tank and towards the inside of the turn.

to the comment about loading the front end.....
as you guys/gals gain experience and seat time, you'll find out that keeping the front end "loaded" to turn in is mostly done with trail braking, at times with engine decel, and some times with pure brute strength and heavy input on the handle bars.

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Old 05-10-2011, 03:50 PM   #49
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PS.. I'm a fan of Codes' words of wisdom. I try to read some of his books here and there.
I like Code because he explains/tells things in a way that my mind remembers.

"Get your head down and go faster" literally does nothing for me.
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Old 05-11-2011, 08:16 AM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Irak View Post
That guy Mick Doohan should've gone to Keith Code's school, maybe he would have made a name of himself riding bikes.
"The Mick Doohan argument" was bound to pop up sometime.

In his prime, he road all sorts of twisted up, but have you seen him in his later years? Much more "traditional."
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Old 05-11-2011, 08:40 AM   #51
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Quote:
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"The Mick Doohan argument" was bound to pop up sometime.

In his prime, he road all sorts of twisted up, but have you seen him in his later years? Much more "traditional."
The point I was trying to make is the same as Tony's. There is no perfect recipe for body position, you may see the fast guys, read a lot of stuff and, at the end, look at Edwards and Spies riding style. Both extremely fast guys whose body position is very different.

I always think of it this way, if Mick Doohan could go fast with that twisted position he had, why can't I?

People tend to preach on body position as if it was the most important aspect of riding, I do not believe that is the case.
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Old 05-11-2011, 09:01 AM   #52
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Old 05-11-2011, 09:03 AM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Irak View Post
The point I was trying to make is the same as Tony's. There is no perfect recipe for body position, you may see the fast guys, read a lot of stuff and, at the end, look at Edwards and Spies riding style. Both extremely fast guys whose body position is very different.

I always think of it this way, if Mick Doohan could go fast with that twisted position he had, why can't I?

People tend to preach on body position as if it was the most important aspect of riding, I do not believe that is the case.
The simple answer to this was conveyed to me by Jason Pridmore in his STAR school. Body position is somewhat subjective, BUT you should try to do the common thing first and only if it doesn't work do you make changes.
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Old 05-11-2011, 09:16 AM   #54
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