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Old 05-10-2011, 08:27 AM   #1
kibitzer
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Body Position - forward or back in seat question

Where do you guys place your in the seat on the track?

I see some guys going into turns far back in the seat and others humping the tank. I'm curious to get racer's and instructor's comments here.
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Old 05-10-2011, 08:30 AM   #2
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I'm an "up on the tank" guy, despite my size. The only time I slide back in the seat is in very heavy braking areas and down long straights. Sliding back in the is worth a couple to three mph at TWS (Texas World Speedway), according to my data acquisition.
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Old 05-10-2011, 08:31 AM   #3
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on the straights, i'm all the way back so my belly can get down behind the tank so my shoulders/head can actually get lower. in turns, my crotch is about a fist away from the tank.
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Old 05-10-2011, 08:33 AM   #4
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i not fast but i change depending on speed mostly, back in the straights, back in wide turns, more up front in slow tight corners.
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Old 05-10-2011, 08:36 AM   #5
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To me it depends on how confident I am in the road surface and my front tire.
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Old 05-10-2011, 08:46 AM   #6
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You want to stay twords the front in the turns to keep weight transfer over the front. Need to keep that front wheel loaded in turns, loosing the rear is MUCH easier to recover from then tucking the front.
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Old 05-10-2011, 08:52 AM   #7
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You want to stay twords the front in the turns to keep weight transfer over the front. Need to keep that front wheel loaded in turns, loosing the rear is MUCH easier to recover from then tucking the front.
This is how it was explained to me as well. Forward in saddle to the apex letting the front tire load and then letting acceleration out of the turn take you back a little to help weight transfer to the rear.
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Old 05-10-2011, 08:55 AM   #8
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Sounds about right, I do try to stay over the front coming out of turns however, if you don't you can pull it up on exit or unload the front end.... A little slip in the rear is ok and on a 600 it is hard to spin up the rear to bad anyways....
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Old 05-10-2011, 09:13 AM   #9
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Old 05-10-2011, 09:15 AM   #10
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Quote:
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You want to stay twords the front in the turns to keep weight transfer over the front. Need to keep that front wheel loaded in turns, loosing the rear is MUCH easier to recover from then tucking the front.
same...i hug the over that tank in cornering. and sit back to try to tuck my big under when in straights.
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Old 05-10-2011, 09:22 AM   #11
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Quote:
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With my size, I have to scoot back on the long straights to get my moobs behind the windscreen.
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Old 05-10-2011, 09:29 AM   #12
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I keep a few inches between my crotch and the tank. Beyond that I really don't move back or forward.
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Old 05-10-2011, 09:32 AM   #13
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Quote:
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As I said in the other thread, is above.

I didn't say you need to be back in the seat all the time. I move around on the seat. , going over wheelie hill I'm off the seat and over the tank. For hard braking I'm on the back of the seat to keep the rear down. With my size, I have to scoot back on the long straights to get my upper body behind the windscreen.
I hear ya. I didn't want to clutter the Ride Smart thread with the discussion. It just seemed the guy was way back in the seat going into a turn. It may have just been the pic, but i'm always interested in picking up as much commentary on BP as I can.
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Old 05-10-2011, 09:33 AM   #14
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Quote:
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I keep a few inches between my crotch and the tank. Beyond that I really don't move back or forward.
You're around 11' feet tall. I don't think there is any room for you to move around.

Us midgets have a little more wiggle room.
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Old 05-10-2011, 09:37 AM   #15
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Quote:
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You're around 11' feet tall. I don't think there is any room for you to move around.

Us midgets have a little more wiggle room.
Well yeah. I was also going to add that once my knees start hurting I'll move any way I can to get a little relief.
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Old 05-10-2011, 09:37 AM   #16
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back of the seat while braking, which is all the way to the apex.
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Old 05-10-2011, 09:37 AM   #17
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Quote:
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You're around 11' feet tall. I don't think there is any room for you to move around.

Us midgets have a little more wiggle room.
Ha! You used the words 'midget' and 'wiggle' in the same sentence!
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Old 05-10-2011, 09:40 AM   #18
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back of the seat while braking, which is all the way to the apex.
Is this specific to you given you're a big fella and need the room to get your torso in the right position or what you teach/recommend to others of any size?
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Old 05-10-2011, 09:43 AM   #19
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Quote:
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Is this specific to you given you're a big fella and need the room to get your torso in the right position or what you teach/recommend to others of any size?
when you're braking the rear is light. Unless you are phenomenal at modulating the clutch teh rear will want to slide (even with the an oem slipper) or even lift from the pavement. The more weight on the back, the less likely to "endo" or slide. weight over the rear tire provides more stability while braking. from apex out it's whatever you feel comfortable with. I like to drop my inside elbow and try to touch my chin to my inside clip on... in the middle of the seat. (but a few inches left or right )

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Old 05-10-2011, 09:44 AM   #20
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For me, up on the tank when cornering. Within reason, the looser my arms are, the better I steer and react. It's about using the lower body to be the primary anchor via legs and core leave your arms and upper body relaxed and loose enough to steer precisely and not be stiff-arming it. Fewer rear/chassis dynamics are transferred to the front when you're not maintaining a stiff armed position, helps keep the bike settled and is a whole lot better as far as not inducing or worsening headshake on exit. The more flexible and loose my elbows are, the better I do. Up on the tank and closer to the clipons helps this for me.

Also, as I'm using my outside leg against the tank to be a primary anchor, closer to the front puts more thigh against the tank and keeps me solid and planted generally (I recall a time or two that the outside foot slipped on the rearset - don't know if being up on the tank helped keep me on the bike, but I didn't come off the bike).

Some of the best riding advice I ever got was years ago from an old Georgia friend of mine that teaches for Schwantz at the Suzuki GP school. He told me to pay attention to my elbows. It sounded silly at first, but it's sound and works on the street and the track. Smooth finesse and measured control come from smooth input from the rider. If my arms are locked and my elbows are tight, I'm probably not being as smooth and measured as I could be.
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