MotoHouston.com MotoHouston.com
Register Members List Member Map Media Calendar Garage Forum Home Mark Forums Read

Go Back   MotoHouston.com > Technical > How To's and Q & A's
Forgot info?

Welcome to MotoHouston.com! You are currently viewing our forums as a guest which gives you limited access to the community. By joining our free community you will have access to great discounts from our sponsors, the ability to post topics, communicate privately with other members, respond to polls, upload content, free email, classifieds, and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free, join our community!

Register Today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.


FREE MH Decals by MAIL!

Advertisement

Reply
Share This Thread: 
Subscribe to this Thread Thread Tools
Old 09-19-2006, 08:18 PM   #1
Gigolo Jason
 
Gigolo Jason's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Magnolia, Texas (AKA: in the woods)
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 3,318

Experience: 10+ years

Bike(s):
BMW R1200C






Evans NPG+ Coolant Conversion Instructions.

This write up is for my 02 Honda 954. Adjust acordingly for your make and model of bike. I did this mod this weekend, it took two days.

Evans NPG+ is non-aqueous, meaning it doesn't like water. It is also incompatible with ordinary coolants. To convert your blade to NPG+, you need to get rid of all the moisture in your cooling system, as well as all traces of incompatible coolant, thus avoiding contamination.

The way to do this is to flush your cooling ystem as if doing a normal coolant change:

1) Remove the air duct covers and both fairing side panels,
2) Remove the pressure cap from the top of the radiator.
3) Drain the coolant by unscrewing the drain plug located on the water pump (see attached picture)
4) Unscrew the cylinder drain plug and drain the coolant from the cylinder jacket. (see picture)
5) Remove and drain both of the main radiator hoses. These are the two large hoses attached to both sides of the radiator.
6) Drain the coolant reservoir overflow bottle by detaching the hose from the filler neck of the radiator and lowering it into the drain pan.

Once the system is thoroughly drained, there will still be some residual incompatible coolant and water. Here, you need to use an intermediate product that will absorb moisture and is compatiable with Evans NPG+: Sierra Coolant or Prestone LowTox Coolant. These coolants are "pet friendly" nonpoisonous coolants you can find almost anywhere. Since they are made with Propylene Glycol (like Evans), but are aqueous like Ethylene Glycol (ordinary coolant), either is the perfect thing to do the job. This will absorb any residual moisture and cleanse the system, but any residual Sierra or Prestone LowTox will not contaminate the Evans Product. After flushing the system as explained above, fill with straight "pet friendly" coolant (no water), burp the system, and bring it up to full operating temperature.

Allow the bike to cool over night and then repeat steps 1-6 listed above and refill with Evans NPG+. Don't forget to add some to the overflow reservoir filling it to normal levels. Evans exapands a bit more then ordinary coolant when hot.

The procedure might sound complicated, but it's easier then it seems and it well worth doing. It will also be the last time you need to flush and refill your cooling system as normal preventative maintenance. In the future, if you need to drain the cooling system for any reason, just capture the NPG+ in a clean container and refill when you're done.

To convert your cooling system to zero pressure, just remove the rubber seal on the inside of your radiator cap. I recomend not doing this untill you are sure that all air bubbles are out of your cooling system. I am giving mine a week before I make this change.

Evans has a boiling point of 370 degrees at 0 PSI compaired to a 50/50 water/coolant boiling point of 264 degrees at 15 psi.

Evans also has a projected life span of 500,000 miles, thus making it a lifetime coolant for your bike.

I will include pictures in following posts.

Here is the test vehical.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	index_001a.JPG
Views:	100
Size:	74.2 KB
ID:	2928  
Gigolo Jason is offline   Reply With Quote
Similar Topics
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
UFC Jones Vs Evans Hollywood02 Events, Meets and Rides 18 04-19-2012 08:56 AM
Rampage vs Evans fight CORNBREAD247 Events, Meets and Rides 4 05-30-2010 11:57 PM
Sexist ATM Instructions Grinchy Off Topic 9 01-12-2008 08:06 PM
Question about Level 1 instructions on track logan5 Ridesmart Motorcycle School 16 07-24-2007 10:14 PM
Advertisement
Old 09-19-2006, 08:19 PM   #2
Gigolo Jason
 
Gigolo Jason's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Magnolia, Texas (AKA: in the woods)
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 3,318

Experience: 10+ years

Bike(s):
BMW R1200C






.

.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	index_004a.JPG
Views:	92
Size:	63.1 KB
ID:	2929  
Gigolo Jason is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2006, 08:19 PM   #3
Gigolo Jason
 
Gigolo Jason's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Magnolia, Texas (AKA: in the woods)
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 3,318

Experience: 10+ years

Bike(s):
BMW R1200C






.....

..
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	index_006a.JPG
Views:	92
Size:	56.1 KB
ID:	2930  
Gigolo Jason is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2006, 08:20 PM   #4
Gigolo Jason
 
Gigolo Jason's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Magnolia, Texas (AKA: in the woods)
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 3,318

Experience: 10+ years

Bike(s):
BMW R1200C






...

...
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	index_007a.JPG
Views:	103
Size:	48.3 KB
ID:	2931  
Gigolo Jason is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2006, 08:21 PM   #5
Gigolo Jason
 
Gigolo Jason's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Magnolia, Texas (AKA: in the woods)
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 3,318

Experience: 10+ years

Bike(s):
BMW R1200C






.....

.....
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	index_009a.JPG
Views:	97
Size:	66.0 KB
ID:	2932  
Gigolo Jason is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2006, 08:41 PM   #6
level5
moving chicane
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 5,825












Thanks for the info.
level5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2006, 08:51 PM   #7
jetcycles
DRIVEN BY ANGER
 
jetcycles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: ShoreAcres
Feedback Rating: (14)
Posts: 12,009

Experience: 10+ years

Bike(s):
1950 Chevy Deluxe
1980 Honda CT70
1987 Kawasaki 650SX
1996 Honda Z50



What sort of temperature changes will this induce? Major benefits? any other Pro's and Con's of running this coolant? Inquiring minds want to know
__________________
I understand the consequences of my actions prior to engaging in those actions. . .there are certain situations in life where the risk is totally worth the reward.
jetcycles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2006, 09:00 PM   #8
Gigolo Jason
 
Gigolo Jason's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Magnolia, Texas (AKA: in the woods)
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 3,318

Experience: 10+ years

Bike(s):
BMW R1200C






Quote:
Originally Posted by jetcycles
What sort of temperature changes will this induce? Major benefits? any other Pro's and Con's of running this coolant? Inquiring minds want to know
I am expecting my operating temps to be the same as they always have been, the only temp change is that my coolant can take 370 degrees now. It effectively raises the ceiling of my coolant system and the max tempurature that my bike can handle.

It also allows you to run a 0 PSI system. This releases pressure on all internal parts of the coolant system, thus extending their life.

It protects against boil overs.

Eliminates system scaling and corrosion

Eliminates pump cavitation

Reduces engine hot spots.

Evans claims it also increases power.

Here is their website for motorcycles

http://www.evanscooling.com/main27.htm

Last edited by Gigolo Jason; 09-19-2006 at 09:03 PM.
Gigolo Jason is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2006, 09:04 PM   #9
TxVrod
Senior Member
 
TxVrod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Arlington, TX
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 3,233












Yup, your engine temp is going to always be at least what your thermostat is regulated for. Fans should come on at the same temp as normal... Your bikes have fans, right?
TxVrod is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2006, 09:06 PM   #10
Sc0
A Lemming
 
Sc0's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Under a Rock
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 603

Experience: 10+ years
Trackdays: 4

Bike(s):
'01 F4i
'03 KFX400 MX
'09 FLHT
'01 Giant NRS1






Send a message via Yahoo to Sc0
I was looking into this stuff as sold by lubespecialists.com. Their for TDI's they mentioned after draining to flush out with water, then to run the engine a bit to get the remaining water out. (granted a bike is simpler than a car) I was actually thinking about it but decided not to, if for some unforsaken reason you do lose coolant you can't mix it with the Evans. You can drain the Evans stuff on the ground and put water or water/coolant mix in but mixing would be a no no. (ask GM mechanics about mixing Dexcool) Also Evans NPG+ is costly, but you gain a higher boiling point and is possible to run a zero pressure coolant system... (Still have to drain it and refill for the track too, if you don't and go down LOTS of people will remember you for a LONG time...)

Worthwhile on a bike, depends on your pocketbook. 75/25% Aquafina/coolant mix works well for me.
Sc0 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2006, 09:06 PM   #11
Gigolo Jason
 
Gigolo Jason's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Magnolia, Texas (AKA: in the woods)
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 3,318

Experience: 10+ years

Bike(s):
BMW R1200C






Quote:
Originally Posted by TxVrod
Yup, your engine temp is going to always be at least what your thermostat is regulated for. Fans should come on at the same temp as normal... Your bikes have fans, right?
lol, Yes, they have fans.:laughing6
Gigolo Jason is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2006, 09:09 PM   #12
Gigolo Jason
 
Gigolo Jason's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Magnolia, Texas (AKA: in the woods)
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 3,318

Experience: 10+ years

Bike(s):
BMW R1200C






Cost for me was around 50 bucks.
Gigolo Jason is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2006, 09:25 PM   #13
jetcycles
DRIVEN BY ANGER
 
jetcycles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: ShoreAcres
Feedback Rating: (14)
Posts: 12,009

Experience: 10+ years

Bike(s):
1950 Chevy Deluxe
1980 Honda CT70
1987 Kawasaki 650SX
1996 Honda Z50



thanks for the lesson, I appreciate the knowledge you all share.
__________________
I understand the consequences of my actions prior to engaging in those actions. . .there are certain situations in life where the risk is totally worth the reward.
jetcycles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2006, 09:33 PM   #14
bentgixxer
Senior Member
 
bentgixxer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Seabrook
Feedback Rating: (2)
Posts: 5,894

Experience: 3 years

Bike(s):
I has no bike :(
'14 Polaris 550 touring








Send a message via Yahoo to bentgixxer
now i may be wrong here, but if there is no pressure in the system, wouldnt the pump be MORE likely to cavitate? I would think with no pressure, it would make it more possible for air to travel with the coolant instead of being " purged " to the highest point.

Please correct me if im wrong, im not really sure.

I'm not good with small water pumps, im used to the 1000-2000 gpm pumps in fire engines. ( not exactly similar, but a waterpump none-the less )
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Helios View Post
We need a subforum for bentgixxer's threads alone.
We'll call it Corpsefish and Horsenuts.
bentgixxer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2006, 05:38 AM   #15
Gigolo Jason
 
Gigolo Jason's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Magnolia, Texas (AKA: in the woods)
Feedback Rating: (0)
Posts: 3,318

Experience: 10+ years

Bike(s):
BMW R1200C






Quote:
Originally Posted by bentgixxer
now i may be wrong here, but if there is no pressure in the system, wouldnt the pump be MORE likely to cavitate?
Zero pressure is sort of a missnomer. Your pump will always provide some pressure through it's normal operation. The zero pressure thing only refers to the radiator cap.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bentgixxer
I would think with no pressure, it would make it more possible for air to travel with the coolant instead of being " purged " to the highest point.
This is correct, that is why I am waiting a week or so before I go zero pressure. I am making sure that there is no air in the system. In the mean time I will be running my normal radiator cap.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bentgixxer
I'm not good with small water pumps, im used to the 1000-2000 gpm pumps in fire engines. ( not exactly similar, but a waterpump none-the less )
I work with mud pumps on drilling rigs, similar to your fire pumps.
Gigolo Jason is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2006, 05:40 AM   #16
bentgixxer
Senior Member
 
bentgixxer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Seabrook
Feedback Rating: (2)
Posts: 5,894

Experience: 3 years

Bike(s):
I has no bike :(
'14 Polaris 550 touring








Send a message via Yahoo to bentgixxer
sounds reasonable to me , might have to look into it for the F3.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Helios View Post
We need a subforum for bentgixxer's threads alone.
We'll call it Corpsefish and Horsenuts.
bentgixxer is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Advertisement


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:43 AM.


MotoHouston.com is not responsible for the content posted by users.
Privacy Policy