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Old 04-05-2011, 01:33 PM   #1
humbleassassin
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Rider awareness?

I seen two bikes go down this morning when I went to Homedepot for work stuff. Riders seamed ok. Bikes scratched up pretty good but they guys had just gloves on. One now has a whole in his jeans and pretty good case of rash on his legs.

First I know from time to time I dont suit up 100% so I cant really judge anyone but aside from that why dont riders pay attention more? I spoke to one guy he said he was reading a text. Older guy on a ugly.. errr Goldwing. The other one pulled in right behind me at Homedepot to check himself and he said he hadnt checked his bike in a while.. back tire had more metal hanging out of it than I knew was in it. He lost it coming around a corner... go figure back tire slipped.


And as far as teh RIP threads wow man.... Its seams there is 3-5 new ones a week.
I know not many are actually the riders fault as in my case I was knocked off the freeway, But some are. Is there something that some of us older riders can do or something to start to help. Anyone we can petition for road conditions.. something. I for one am tired of seeing the rip threads and just wonder if anyone knows ideas to help instead of just stand by and watch others like you die.
List thoughts on what you might think that can really be done to help not just fantasy ideas.
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Old 04-05-2011, 01:45 PM   #2
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Old 04-05-2011, 02:03 PM   #3
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I just got back into motorcycles a year or so ago. Having to take the MSF course or pass the DPS skills test to satisfy the "M" endorsement on a license seems like a REALLY good idea. Just reading some of the posts on here about people riding without a "M" on their license for years is somewhat of a shocker. I, for one, learned a LOT in the MSF course.
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Old 04-05-2011, 02:06 PM   #4
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Rider awareness is just as important as DRIVER AWARENESS.

To help this, I've adjusted my driving habits. A few years younger, I used to text when I drove, talk on the phone, etc. I learned the error of my ways before I hurt myself or someone else. Now when I drive, I concentrate on driving. I limit my time talking on the phone- I try not to do it at all! I don't text, surf the internet, etc. When I'm behind the wheel, I try to concentrate solely on driving!

Whats more, I try to rub my good habits off on friends/family. I answer texts for them if they're driving, call someone for them for directions, etc.

I even look twice for motorcyclists now, even moreso than before!

It doesn't solve all our problems, but its one less cager out there thats not paying attention.
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Old 04-05-2011, 02:16 PM   #5
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One of the best things you can do is talk to everyone around you about safety. I was surprised at how people who do really dangerous were ready to listen as soon as I spoke to them. Host noob rides and have a riders meeting. You never know when your words could save a life. On the other hand, you can tell when someone isn't going to listen to anything. Let them learn the hard way.
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Old 04-05-2011, 02:20 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stang Man View Post
Rider awareness is just as important as DRIVER AWARENESS.
^Unfortunately, there isn't much that can be done to drastically change they way cagers drive or pay attention on the road.


which is why it is THAT MUCH more important that riders stay TRAINED, VIGILANT and AWARE at all times.

MSF is a Must. and I'm almost willing to say that even a track day is a must.
riders need to be aware of the basics when on the roads. Like understanding a drivers blind spot, looking a few cars ahead when on the highway to gauge the traffic pattern and where to position yourself in a lane to avoid getting merged into.

Clear your Intersection before you drag race that corolla with the cute girl in it off the line at the red light!!!

of course, refraining from doing the squidly (which we are all guilty of...including myself) when on the roads.

GEAR....GEAR...GEAR...GEAR!

The devil is in the details when riding the streets, and any form of complacency can potentially great an awful situation.
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Old 04-05-2011, 02:32 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Versatile337 View Post
One of the best things you can do is talk to everyone around you about safety. I was surprised at how people who do really dangerous were ready to listen as soon as I spoke to them. Host noob rides and have a riders meeting. You never know when your words could save a life. On the other hand, you can tell when someone isn't going to listen to anything. Let them learn the hard way.
this.

makes a big difference when the people around you are riding with safety first.
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