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Old 03-07-2011, 01:30 PM   #1
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Old 03-07-2011, 01:37 PM   #2
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The difficulty with EGO is that it is not hindered by outside advice. By its very nature it cannot be. The only thing that breaks EGO also breaks bones and bikes.


Just my opinion.
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Old 03-07-2011, 01:44 PM   #3
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Only fix I've found for EGO is to make the group ride at the pace the slowest rider is comfortable at.

Anytime you have wide disparities of skill you'll have someone "trying to keep up".

Every ride I've done or been on there has been a discussion about "ride your own ride". Most times it goes in one ear and out the other.
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Old 03-07-2011, 02:03 PM   #4
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Although I have'nt participated in Mh rides, it seems like a good idea to, at least, have somebody that is part of the organizing effort, stay back with the slower riders so they don't feel left behind.
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Old 03-07-2011, 02:06 PM   #5
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There is usually a designated sweeper.. but even when you have "fast" and "slow" groups... someone always decides to jump groups.. or the old peer pressure comes in and don't want to admit being "slow".
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Old 03-07-2011, 02:20 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by morvegil View Post
Was thinking most times that there is a crash its because someone was "trying to keep up" or "ride like the fast guy".

I always say, ride your own pace, only push a little at time, especially when no one is close by.

So how about everyone before a ride give that piece of advice, I think we are a community could see less RIP & crash threads if someone just spoke up before a ride.

What do you guys think?
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Old 03-07-2011, 02:22 PM   #7
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Old 03-07-2011, 02:25 PM   #8
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The idea is great however once everyone put on their helmets who knows what goes into their heads, maybe they are thinking if the guy in front can do it then he can do it..... On our group rides i do tell people to stay with the slower group and only move up if they are comfortable with the pace..... some people listen and some just dont, great idea but it is hard to force people to ride slow if they think they have the skills to keep up.
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Old 03-07-2011, 02:29 PM   #9
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If it makes you nervous or uneasy then you are going to fast. That is something people don't understand. If you are nervous when following someone you are in fact the slower rider because fast guys don't get nervous going around corners. They are confident and know what the bike can do and and that is why they are fast. They know they can make it around the turn so they have no reason to be nervous. Nervous=too fast. Not nervous but having fun=good pace. Bored=too slow. Slowly but surely you will become less nervous and faster speeds and that is how you know you are progressing. At least with street riding anyway.
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Old 03-07-2011, 02:33 PM   #10
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The "nervous" speeds are best kept on the track anyhow....

The real trick is finding a group of like-minded riders that enjoy riding together, as opposed to spliting into seperate groups.. the bigger the group the better odds are that someone will be over their heads.
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Old 03-07-2011, 02:40 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by morvegil View Post
Was thinking most times that there is a crash its because someone was "trying to keep up" or "ride like the fast guy".

I always say, ride your own pace, only push a little at time, especially when no one is close by.

So how about everyone before a ride give that piece of advice, I think we are a community could see less RIP & crash threads if someone just spoke up before a ride.

What do you guys think?
Leadership could prevent ALOT of these incidents. Not All, but alot.
You should be able to tell whether a rider is riding over their head.
Tell-tale signs of bad body position, inconsistent speed through corners, bad preparation for corners are a precursor. Leaders and sweepers need to be aware of this, and say something to keep people safe. If someone is choosing to ignore things like this, they can choose to go ahead and ride outside of the group.

Stating "ride your own ride" is like a corporate release of liability. It doesn't inform or control anything.

Just because you setup a thread on MH, doesn't mean your ride is "organized" either...
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Old 03-07-2011, 03:49 PM   #12
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Leadership could prevent ALOT of these incidents. Not All, but alot.
So true, it's a shame that more people don't get it. The people who organize riders do so as Leaders. When Leaders post up a recurring weekend rides to Racers Road (the latest craze, but just a short and only mildly interesting ride), Fayetteville, or 3090 and then brag about the high speeds and post triple digit videos, what do you expect? We are going to see the crash reports from these rides a few times a month and it will build until there is a fatality or two. The Leaders then "get it" and either take the high speeds to the track or they bow out. Then, over time, the cycle recurs.

Take a moment to remember all the riders who didn't make it through the cycle.
 
Old 03-07-2011, 04:06 PM   #13
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The best advice is the one you give to yourself, after that first corner that you have that "oh " moment your first reaction should be to slow down and not keep going at the same pace..... i know that track day organizers are a business and will not let this incident go to waste without pushing some......"take it to the track sales pitch"!

Now in all seriousness, leadership only works for those who are willing to listen! Ultimately it is "The Rider Himself" who is in "Total Control" of his right hand and the throttle, no one else!

From my experience riding in groups, even the most organized rides have accidents! Whenever you have a large group of riders down any stretch of road "boring or not" you are subject to the same chances of a rider going down for whatever reason. The only way to have fewer incidents is to ride in a smaller group with riders that have similar skills and where you know how each person rides!
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Old 03-07-2011, 04:20 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunday_rider View Post
The best advice is the one you give to yourself, after that first corner that you have that "oh " moment your first reaction should be to slow down and not keep going at the same pace..... i know that track day organizers are a business and will not let this incident go to waste without pushing some......"take it to the track sales pitch"!

Now in all seriousness, leadership only works for those who are willing to listen! Ultimately it is "The Rider Himself" who is in "Total Control" of his right hand and the throttle, no one else!

From my experience riding in groups, even the most organized rides have accidents! Whenever you have a large group of riders down any stretch of road "boring or not" you are subject to the same chances of a rider going down for whatever reason. The only way to have fewer incidents is to ride in a smaller group with riders that have similar skills and where you know how each person rides!

Good leadership works ALL the time. Your leadership should allow you to keep the group safe and notice people "out of control" and enlighten them or remove them from the group.

There's always accidents, but you can't ignore the frequency of wrecks on rides. It's like its expected around here, sad really. The larger the group, the safer you have to be. You are not subject to the same chances, unless you are not in control of your own group, period.
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Old 03-07-2011, 04:21 PM   #15
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Old 03-07-2011, 04:27 PM   #16
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Good leadership works ALL the time. Your leadership should allow you to keep the group safe and notice people "out of control" and enlighten them or remove them from the group.

There's always accidents, but you can't ignore the frequency of wrecks on rides. It's like its expected around here, sad really. The larger the group, the safer you have to be. You are not subject to the same chances, unless you are not in control of your own group, period.
Maybe you have never ridden in a large group but "Leaders" as the term implies means that the person is leading the ride..... that means the leader will never see what goes behind him unless he grows eyes in the back of his head!

Whatever happened to common sense? if you don't feel comfortable riding at the speed that everyone else is riding then simply slow the down, plain and simple! It is time that people take responsibility for their own actions and stop blaming others for it!

When a rider goes down at the track, who's fault is it? mainly his own for running too hot into a corner right? well, same logic applies on the street!
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Old 03-07-2011, 04:28 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunday_rider View Post
The best advice is the one you give to yourself, after that first corner that you have that "oh " moment your first reaction should be to slow down and not keep going at the same pace..... i know that track day organizers are a business and will not let this incident go to waste without pushing some......"take it to the track sales pitch"!

Now in all seriousness, leadership only works for those who are willing to listen! Ultimately it is "The Rider Himself" who is in "Total Control" of his right hand and the throttle, no one else!

From my experience riding in groups, even the most organized rides have accidents! Whenever you have a large group of riders down any stretch of road "boring or not" you are subject to the same chances of a rider going down for whatever reason. The only way to have fewer incidents is to ride in a smaller group with riders that have similar skills and where you know how each person rides!
Which is why you will rarely see me going on a large group ride. Whether everyone wants to admit it or not it really is a recipe for disaster. It's like inviting a bunch of random people that not everyone knows to go shoot guns on someone's property. F*** that. I don't want some idiot who has never handled a weapon to shoot me in the leg when I'm not looking. Everyone likes to pretend it's to help out new riders and a whole laundry list of other humanitarian efforts, but the best idea is to ride in small groups with like minded people and if you feel the need to help others then make a bunch of sandwiches and give them to hungry people.
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Old 03-07-2011, 04:34 PM   #18
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I like to start my rides from the back of the group. First, I dont like riding in close proximity to people i have not ridden with. Second, I will creep up past people who dont ride as fast or aggressive as me.

Usually I stop moving up the "pack" when i get into a position where im a good pace behind the next guy. Third, if some guy is "faster" or wants to get ahead of me i move to the right to allow him a safe pass. I think this is common courtesy.
That is exactly how i did it when i first started riding in groups Back then there were no riders meeting at all, just plain common sense
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Old 03-07-2011, 04:36 PM   #19
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so the leader has to basically babysit all the riders?
teach them and put them in line?
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Old 03-07-2011, 04:39 PM   #20
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Which is why you will rarely see me going on a large group ride. Whether everyone wants to admit it or not it really is a recipe for disaster. It's like inviting a bunch of random people that not everyone knows to go shoot guns on someone's property. F*** that. I don't want some idiot who has never handled a weapon to shoot me in the leg when I'm not looking. Everyone likes to pretend it's to help out new riders and a whole laundry list of other humanitarian efforts, but the best idea is to ride in small groups with like minded people and if you feel the need to help others then make a bunch of sandwiches and give them to hungry people.
That is exactly how i felt 3 weeks ago when we had close to 30 bikes where i knew only half of them, that day i decided to stay way in the back because i saw a few ego riders moving up the line at the stop light and was seriously afraid that any one of those kids could hit me from behind in case i needed to make an emergency maneuver. I was so glad that day went without any incidents!
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