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Old 08-23-2010, 03:56 PM   #21
JetG
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sumo View Post
I'm too fat to ride stock springs. Kinda solves that issue.

But I could stand to check my tire pressures more often.
I am the complete opposite I am to skinny to ride the stock spring, 140-145lbs
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Old 08-23-2010, 06:32 PM   #22
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Here is a little secret that everyone may not know. Normal air is 78% Nitrogen. I now big shock! I don't see wasting the money for nitrogen fill up, I doubt the ~20% additional nitrogen will make that much of a difference in anything.
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Old 08-23-2010, 07:00 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timistim View Post
Here is a little secret that everyone may not know. Normal air is 78% Nitrogen. I now big shock! I don't see wasting the money for nitrogen fill up, I doubt the ~20% additional nitrogen will make that much of a difference in anything.
Well considering how huge of a diff that a small change in pressure can make (sliding/slipping vs. feeling perfect), then Im going to totally disagree with you. When the pressure change is lower 1-2 psi vs. 3-5psi its much easier to get a pressure dialed in faster. I've had days that it literally took 2-3 full sessions before my pressures were right where I wanted them. The biggest prob is the temp change during the day and as the track gets hotter. When this happens the pressured start changing again.. Im not sure about you, but I dont like tires feeling slippery when Im out there giving it 100% of what I got.

This is mostly related to a trackday/race situation tho. The street is not as critical as Im sure everyone knows.
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Old 08-23-2010, 07:12 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sumo View Post
I'm too fat to ride stock springs. Kinda solves that issue.

But I could stand to check my tire pressures more often.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Incognito View Post
I am the complete opposite I am to skinny to ride the stock spring, 140-145lbs
Ok, I hear this a lot and find it hard to believe. I hear 145 lbs guys saying too skinny and 210 lbs guys saying too fat. I think Patrick told me that the stock springs are dialed in for a 160 lb rider on my bike. And when I had it setup, they said I would be near the stock's limit with me 220 lbs and a passenger 130lbs.

Why would stock springs only be for people between 150-200 lbs? I mean are they just junk that's thrown on for cost cutting or has penske, ohlins, and racetech got deep inside your heads. I know you racers demand more from your bikes but for a normal rider.
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Old 08-23-2010, 07:21 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Versatile337 View Post
Ok, I hear this a lot and find it hard to believe. I hear 145 lbs guys saying too skinny and 210 lbs guys saying too fat. I think Patrick told me that the stock springs are dialed in for a 160 lb rider on my bike. And when I had it setup, they said I would be near the stock's limit with me 220 lbs and a passenger 130lbs.

Why would stock springs only be for people between 150-200 lbs? I mean are they just junk that's thrown on for cost cutting or has penske, ohlins, and racetech got deep inside your heads. I know you racers demand more from your bikes but for a normal rider.
You're exactly right bro. Regular street and track riders usually don't need upgraded suspension. The stock suspension is already pretty good. What is important is setting sag and then adjust comp/rebound to your prefference.
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Old 08-23-2010, 07:38 PM   #26
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^^ don't forget geometry^^

Ride height & sag go hand in hand but that's where springs come in. If you can't get ride height correct because u weigh too much then your geometry is less than ideal and probably way off while loaded up in a corner. Which I found out personally how big geometry/rideheight/rake can throw off handling

Last edited by Mark06gsxr; 08-23-2010 at 07:42 PM.
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Old 08-23-2010, 08:26 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AJFLo View Post
You're exactly right bro. Regular street and track riders usually don't need upgraded suspension. The stock suspension is already pretty good. What is important is setting sag and then adjust comp/rebound to your prefference.
Great post, and lots of good info. This is important too, a lot of people buy bikes from other riders, and often the bike was already setup.....for the previous owner. Something to keep in mind when the bike you just bought doesn't make you feel all warm and fuzzy..........it might still need to be tweaked a bit too suit YOU.
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Old 08-23-2010, 09:15 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Versatile337 View Post
Ok, I hear this a lot and find it hard to believe. I hear 145 lbs guys saying too skinny and 210 lbs guys saying too fat. I think Patrick told me that the stock springs are dialed in for a 160 lb rider on my bike. And when I had it setup, they said I would be near the stock's limit with me 220 lbs and a passenger 130lbs.

Why would stock springs only be for people between 150-200 lbs? I mean are they just junk that's thrown on for cost cutting or has penske, ohlins, and racetech got deep inside your heads. I know you racers demand more from your bikes but for a normal rider.
Suspension (shocks/forks) is designed to operate the best in a certain range. The spring rate is designed to support the weight of the bike and rider in that range, +- a certain amount of adjustment.

The problem comes in when you either need too much preload on the spring or can't take out enough to get the proper sag. The "sag" puts the suspension in the center of the best operating range, where you won't top out or bottom the shock.

The difference in the high end stuff is the valving and spring rate can be tailored to each individual rider. Production parts have to be close for a wide range, whereas aftermarket is dialed in personally.

The valving and spring rate in the newer sport bikes is designed to work well for an "average 160 lbs" rider, and also be good for stock racing classes that limit mods to the bike (since the 600/1000 class bikes are developed for racing first, street second). There is enough adjustment to allow tuning for 30-40 lbs either way, but it won't be optimized. Go up towards 220-250 riders and you are looking at significant changes to both the springs and valving, since the valving has to be correct for the spring rate...

The suspension on YOUR bike needs to be dialed in for YOU, in order to get the best out of what the bike has to offer. It is your only link and control to what the tires are doing.. and with a pair of contact patches the size of a cigarette pack is vitally important.

Also keep in mind that track settings are usually too stiff for the street, so be honest with whomever sets it up as to how and where you plan to ride.
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Last edited by texlurch; 08-23-2010 at 09:17 PM.
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Old 08-23-2010, 09:36 PM   #29
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And since this thread was initially pointed at checking tire pressures...

Most people don't realize that your tires are actually acting somewhat as springs. Less pressure makes them a softer spring, more pressure stiffer. This translates into how the bike rides, stiffer or softer. Also how it handles, slow to react or quick and snappy.

Tires also need some amount of flex to work the best and provide grip, but run them too low and they will give a squirmy feel, plus over heat when worked hard.

Too much pressure and they will skitter across bumps and seams, and make the ride feel stiffer.

Find the sweet spot and you'll definately feel the difference, both in ride and handling.
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Old 08-23-2010, 09:53 PM   #30
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Depends on what you mean by "ride". If I happen to be taking the bike to work or something of the sort, I do my usual cursory once over. I had my suspension set up to my weight a couple years back....I noticed the difference in the twisties immediately. It cut down on those pesky mid-level bumps.

Now when it comes time to do some serious riding (hitting up the back roads), darn straight I do a thorough inspection of the bike. I put that sucker up on my Pit Bull stands and:
inspect the tires
check tire pressure
inspect brakes and rotors
inspect chain
check oil level

I do this religiously before each and every "real ride"
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Old 08-23-2010, 10:02 PM   #31
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Good post, especially as we approach the end of summer
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Old 08-26-2010, 07:10 PM   #32
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