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Old 02-01-2010, 09:00 PM   #41
ForgottnSoul
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I have the same issue but with rights............ ok well its not that bad but I feel it nonthe less. I actually have the same issue with anything that requires me to lean and turn........... like when I would play roller hockey........ my lefts were strong but rights not so much.
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Old 02-01-2010, 10:36 PM   #42
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I have the same issue with the left. Rights come with ease, but the left I have to make sure I look where i'm going to end up and just lean and roll thru. That has been the thing that helps me. oh ya, and backer down a little on the lefts..... Good luck with it. It will come.
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Old 02-01-2010, 11:50 PM   #43
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i dont know if its been said, ride on your feet not your . get behind the clip on not on top of. riding on your feet will make a big difference. get your off the seat literally. ride on your feet.
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Old 02-02-2010, 12:58 AM   #44
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Curt made an excellent post, go back to basics, like building blocks. Whenever I am trying to teach someone, I tell them to exaggerate everything until it becomes habit.

When you look thru a turn, LOOK; take your entire head and shoulders and get it over behind the mirror.
PUSH the bar to countersteer
etc, etc

If you practice and build the fundamentals until they become habits, everything else comes easy.

Unless you are ambidextrous, you'll always have a strong/weak side, so just fix the basics and you'll be fine.
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Old 02-02-2010, 01:17 AM   #45
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nice read maxgs

I make it a point to exaggerate most of my turns hoping it would sink in. Also, the more I do it, the more "correct" the turn feels.
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Old 02-02-2010, 08:15 AM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maxgs View Post
So I've been thinking more about this question and I think there might be a way to help besides another recommendation to go to the track. I suspect that riders favoring a particular side might have to do with leaning and cornering "instinctively". It's quite possible that riders can turn one direction better than another because they don't purposefully turn into corners nor really consider exactly what they are doing to initiate and then sustain a turn.

Of course going to the track helps a rider learn this in spades, whether or not they think about the steps or methods they use to turn. So, for the street, here's what I'd recommend. First on your "good side" practice initiating the turn first using counter steering. I typically think about it as weighting the bar or the clip on in the direction I want to turn. Racers will talk about weighting clipons so heavily that they develop callouses. Weighting the bar is one way to describe it, but what's also (or perhaps really) happening is you are pushing the inside grip away from the turn. Try that first on your good side to initiate a turn and then try it on the other side.

The next method to explore to initiate and, even moreso, sustain a turn is to weight the inside peg. Start by weighting it lightly and as you get more confidence, you can weight it to the point that the vast majority of your weight is on the inside peg. When I say "vast majority" what I mean is that you aren't actually sitting on the bike... your weight is down low, supported by your feet on the rear sets. You really can steer the bike on the street almost exclusively with weight on the pegs, try it.

Lastly, also experiment with shifting your weight well in advance of the turn. This isn't some crazy - get way off the bike - shift, often it's a half a cheek or maybe as much as having the center of your on the edge of the seat.

By trying these things independently and then in combination, you can "re-learn" how you are turning in and sustaining a turn. As I mentioned earlier, I suspect riders turn "instinctively". As such, it's good to go back and think about how one actually turns a bike and practice the steps.

-Curt
Curt,

Thank you. This is truly some solid advice that I will put to use.
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Old 02-02-2010, 08:44 AM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maxgs View Post
So I've been thinking more about this question and I think there might be a way to help besides another recommendation to go to the track. I suspect that riders favoring a particular side might have to do with leaning and cornering "instinctively". It's quite possible that riders can turn one direction better than another because they don't purposefully turn into corners nor really consider exactly what they are doing to initiate and then sustain a turn.

Of course going to the track helps a rider learn this in spades, whether or not they think about the steps or methods they use to turn. So, for the street, here's what I'd recommend. First on your "good side" practice initiating the turn first using counter steering. I typically think about it as weighting the bar or the clip on in the direction I want to turn. Racers will talk about weighting clipons so heavily that they develop callouses. Weighting the bar is one way to describe it, but what's also (or perhaps really) happening is you are pushing the inside grip away from the turn. Try that first on your good side to initiate a turn and then try it on the other side.

The next method to explore to initiate and, even moreso, sustain a turn is to weight the inside peg. Start by weighting it lightly and as you get more confidence, you can weight it to the point that the vast majority of your weight is on the inside peg. When I say "vast majority" what I mean is that you aren't actually sitting on the bike... your weight is down low, supported by your feet on the rear sets. You really can steer the bike on the street almost exclusively with weight on the pegs, try it.

Lastly, also experiment with shifting your weight well in advance of the turn. This isn't some crazy - get way off the bike - shift, often it's a half a cheek or maybe as much as having the center of your on the edge of the seat.

By trying these things independently and then in combination, you can "re-learn" how you are turning in and sustaining a turn. As I mentioned earlier, I suspect riders turn "instinctively". As such, it's good to go back and think about how one actually turns a bike and practice the steps.

-Curt
+1 I also think it's a good idea to get in the habit of standing on the pegs to lift your slightly off the seat to get on the edge of the seat instead of trying to slide your from one side of the seat to the other. That way your weight is already on the pegs
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Old 02-02-2010, 10:16 AM   #48
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I just remembered something: At high speeds, the rear kinda wiggles (and sorta feels unsafe) when I slide my from one side to the other. Is that normal or is it either because of my 200lb or the 250?
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Old 02-02-2010, 10:47 AM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ares View Post
I just remembered something: At high speeds, the rear kinda wiggles (and sorta feels unsafe) when I slide my from one side to the other. Is that normal or is it either because of my 200lb or the 250?
When you shift your weight it's going to affect the bike. Practice being smooth
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Old 02-02-2010, 11:02 AM   #50
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Quote:
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I just remembered something: At high speeds, the rear kinda wiggles (and sorta feels unsafe) when I slide my from one side to the other. Is that normal or is it either because of my 200lb or the 250?
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Old 02-02-2010, 11:03 AM   #51
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When you shift your weight it's going to affect the bike. Practice being smooth
+1. Make it one fluid motion in sliding over some.
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Old 02-02-2010, 11:18 AM   #52
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.... again, instead of worrying about sliding your around on the street, work on the fundamentals first. Hanging off on the streets is un-needed for 99% of riders and just adds more stuff to the mix.

Instead of worrying about track form, work on basics. It IS the street after all.

Now, that being said, if you are going fast enough that you are dragging hard parts and your toes, by all means get off the seat. Otherwise you are just posing.
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Old 02-02-2010, 05:43 PM   #53
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.... again, instead of worrying about sliding your around on the street, work on the fundamentals first. Hanging off on the streets is un-needed for 99% of riders and just adds more stuff to the mix.
Instead of worrying about track form, work on basics. It IS the street after all. Now, that being said, if you are going fast enough that you are dragging hard parts and your toes, by all means get off the seat. Otherwise you are just posing.
No sir, I won't be using this advice to help me on the streets or the forest
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Old 02-02-2010, 06:12 PM   #54
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Quote:
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I just remembered something: At high speeds, the rear kinda wiggles (and sorta feels unsafe) when I slide my from one side to the other. Is that normal or is it either because of my 200lb or the 250?
Its the suspension on your 250. I just rode an 09 at GSS on Sunday, it did the same thing.
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Old 02-02-2010, 06:39 PM   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texlurch View Post
.... again, instead of worrying about sliding your around on the street, work on the fundamentals first. Hanging off on the streets is un-needed for 99% of riders and just adds more stuff to the mix.

Instead of worrying about track form, work on basics. It IS the street after all.

Now, that being said, if you are going fast enough that you are dragging hard parts and your toes, by all means get off the seat. Otherwise you are just posing.
I try to hang off and do some of these things because its just more of a mental thing and helps me feel confident in my riding.
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